Nanotech Security Corp. Upsizes Financing to $4.2 Million


piezoelectric-graphene

As a result of further investor interest, Nanotech has upsized the Unit Placement to $4.2million

Vancouver, British Columbia, August 23rd, 2013: Nanotech Security Corp. (the “Company”) (TSX-V: NTS), developer of next-generation security and authentication features using patented nano-optics announces that further to its news release of August 22nd, 2013, the Company will be seeking regulatory approval to upsize the Subscription Receipts financing from $3.9 million announced August 22nd,2013 to up to $4.2 million. The hold period will expire 4 months from final tranche closing date. The final tranche remains subject to TSX acceptance.

More information about the Company can be found at the Company’s website http://www.nanosecurity.ca

Advertisements

The World’s 20 Hottest Startup Scenes


Carbon NanotubeSure, Silicon  Valley is still No. 1, but some surprising cities like Sao Paulo, Brazil and  Bangalore, India have become successful startup hubs over the past decade.  Startup Genome’s Startup Ecosystem Report 2012 ranked the top 20 most active startup scenes in the  world based on criteria including funding, entrepreneurial mindset,  trendsetting, support, talent and more.

According to data compiled by financial-software firm Intuit, some of the cities even outshine entrepreneurial  darling Silicon Valley. For example, 20 percent of Santiago, Chile‘s  entrepreneurs are women compared with a paltry 10 percent in the Valley.

For the full list and more about the top 20 entrepreneurial cities around the  world, take a look at the infographic below.

Click  to Enlarge+

The World's 20 Hottest Startup Scenes (Infographic)

 

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227832#ixzz2cA93pTCb

University of British Columbia Files Patent on Unique Battery Type Solar/Light Conversion Cell


SOURCE: University of British Columbia

University of British Columbia

November 02, 2012 11:30 ET

VANCOUVER, BC–(Marketwire – Nov 2, 2012) – The University of British Columbia (UBC)announces the international patent filing for a Battery type Solar/Light conversion cell. This unique generator and storage approach allows both solar power generation and storage within a single cell. Based on photosynthesis, it can be implemented using abundant and readily replenished and renewable biomaterials.

This invention aims to allow industry to install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems with a built in energy storage component. This type of system addresses the natural intermittency of Solar (PV) systems due to the movement of clouds over modules and the need for night time power, and it provides a built-in solution for reducing the total demand on the electrical grid. This unit is anticipated to provide a simple effective method for energy arbitrage by storing direct and indirect Solar/Light energy for later use should the peak energy demands fall several hours after the peak solar generation is available, such as at night. The commercialization of this technical achievement would allow for a much larger penetration of solar PV into the total energy supply and management system and therefore the invention has the potential to increase the value and market for both grid-connected and off-grid solar PV systems worldwide.

The invention is the result of an interdisciplinary venture led by Professor J. Thomas Beatty, who studies photosynthesis in micro-organisms, and Professor John D. Madden in Electrical & Computer Engineering. “We began by asking whether we can learn from nature and make use of natural materials to create useful solar energy harvesting approaches. What we found is an approach that integrates two key components of energy supply: generation and storage”.

The new approach involves the use of a light absorbing battery-like cell complete with two electrodes and an electrolyte. Light is absorbed by light harvesting molecules in the electrolyte. Charges are then transferred between the excited light harvesting molecules and mediator molecules, also in the electrolyte, with nearly perfect quantum efficiency. The mediators store the harvested energy, which can then be extracted at the electrodes on demand. Essential to the effectiveness of this technology is the development of highly selective electrodes, each of which primarily reacts with only one type of mediator.

“Unlike photovoltaic technologies, which rely on very thin absorbing layers, and transparent electrodes, this new technology operates with light arriving parallel to the surface of the electrodes, allowing for thicker devices with volume for energy storage,” says Madden. “With the new architecture one can envision the creation of solar ponds for harvesting and storage. This is a very general new approach.”

The UBC team is supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Researchers from the University of South Florida and the Australian Centre of Excellence in Electro materials Science are also involved.

The University of British Columbia, located in Vancouver, BC, is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the top 40 universities of the world. UBC attracts $550 million per year in research funding from government, non-profit organizations and industry through more than 8,000 projects. It ranks in the top ten universities in North America for commercializing research and has spun off 149 companies. It is a place where innovative scientific ideas are transferred effectively to industry through a globally connected research community.