An EV Battery That Charges Fully In 5 Minutes? Commercialization Step-Up Could Come Soon


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Electric vehicles now comprise a substantial part of the automotive market. But the fact remains that despite the increasing number of charging stations, it is still inconvenient to charge a car in comparison to getting a tank full of gas.

StoreDot, an Israeli startup, might have the solution to the woes of electric vehicle (EV) owners, with a new battery it claims can fully charge in five minutes and drive the EV 300 miles on a single charge.

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Read About the Company: Enabling the Future of Charging

The battery is made of nano-materials in a layered structure, made of special organic compounds manufactured by the company. This, the company said, is a massive improvement over traditional lithium-ion battery.

The company first demonstrated the technology at Microsoft Think Next in 2015. The company says the batteries are in the “advanced stages of development” and might be integrated into electric vehicles in the next three years. It also says that its chemical compound is not flammable and has a higher level of combustion, reducing the level of resistance in the batteries making it safe for use in cars.

The batteries won’t be too difficult to manufacture either — the company estimates that 80 percent of the manufacturing process is the same as regular lithium-ion batteries.

StoreDot specializes in battery technology. Last year, it showcased a smartphone battery capable of fully charging within 30 seconds. The EV battery is a scaled up version of this battery which has multi-function electrodes, a combination of polymer and metal oxide.

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An electric car battery that could charge in just five minutes ~ Where is the Israeli Start-Up “+StoreDot” One Year Later? +Video

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An electric car battery that could charge in just five minutes ~ Where is the Israeli Start-Up “+StoreDot” One Year Later? +Video


An Israeli startup is setting its sights on creating a battery for electric carsthat charges in just five minutes. If they meet their goal, the battery would be able to power a car for hundreds of miles in a single charge. StoreDot, founded in 2012, has already developed the FlashBattery for Smartphones that can fully charge in less than a minute. The startup has raised $66 million which it plans to use to get their FlashBattery technology into electric cars.

The relatively slow growth of the electric car market is often blamed upon the inconvenience of recharging. The best batteries currently available can last up to 250 miles, but take several hours to fully charge using a standard charger. Tesla’s high-speed charger takes 30 minutes to give their batteries about 170 miles of range, while Toyota’s Rav4, which takes longer to charge, can only go around 100 miles per charge. A fast-charging, affordable battery with long range, like the one StoreDot has proposed, could be the key to making electric cars more popular than their gas-powered competitors.

Related: The world’s fastest charging electric bus powers up in 10 seconds flat

 

StoreDot describes their battery as a sponge, which soaks up electricity like a sponge soaks up water. The technology is based on peptides that have been turned into energy-storing nanotubes. The nanotubes, affectionately named Nanodots by the company, can soak up huge amounts of electricity all at once. Using around 7,000 of these Nanodots, they have promised to create an EV battery that goes the distance.

EV batteries, electric cars, electric car batteries, fast-charging batteries, StoreDot, Israel technology, lithium-ion, green technology, green cars

“This fast-charging technology shortens the amount of time drivers will have to wait in line to charge their cars, while also reducing the number of charging posts in each station,” Dr. Doron Myersdorf, StoreDot’s CEO told crowds at the 2014 ThinkNext event. It will result in “considerably cutting the overall cost of owning an electric car.”

For the Latest News About +StoreDot Go to: +StoreDot

Good news! Nanotech that can Charge Your Phone in 30 Seconds!


cellphone-hero-620x413Summary: If you’ve ever had just five minutes to charge your smartphone’s flat battery and wished it didn’t take an hour, help is at hand. An Israeli company is working on a nano-material that could see your mobile fully charged in just seconds.

In offices in a dusty street near the Diamond Exchange building in Ramat Gan, something interesting is afoot: a company called StoreDot is working on battery technology that many mobile users will have been longing for for some time.

The basis of StoreDot’s work was discovered during a University of Tel Aviv research project into Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers found that a certain peptide molecule that ‘shortens’ neurons in the brain causing Alzheimer’s was also seeming to show high capacitance, thanks to an ability called ‘charge trapping’ — where electrons are effectively held in place.

According to Professor Gil Rosenman, who worked on the project and is now StoreDot’s chief scientist, two of these molecules can be used to create a viable crystal only two nanometers long. These crystals form the NanoDots at the heart of Storedot’s technology.

Artificially synthesised from the same building blocks — elements such as oxygen and hydrogen — as natural peptides, these NanoDots could prove disruptive to multi-billion-dollar industries such as batteries, displays, image sensors, and non-volatile memory.

Doron Myersdorf, former head of SanDisk’s SSD division and now StoreDot’s CEO, says that the company has decided to focus on NanoDots’ uses in smartphone related technologies, including faster memory; more sensitive camera sensors ultrafast-charging batteries; and flexible, energy-efficient displays.

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Founded in 2012, StoreDot is now chiefly concentrating on the last two areas. Demoing this week at Microsoft’s ThinkNext event in Tel Aviv, StoreDot showed a prototype of a battery using NanoDots — powering a standard Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone — that charged from flat to full in under a minute.

How does it work? The NanoDots cover the tiny ‘cavities’ that cover an electrode found in a standard battery, extending its reactive surface, and allowing its capacity to be increased tenfold.  Through the addition of the NanoDots, the electrode becomes “multi-function” — at one end, the electrode stores electrical energy creating a capacitor, and at the other, lets it flow into the battery’s lithium.

In layman’s terms, StoreDot has created a ‘buffer’ that stores electrical current coming from the wall socket over a period of around thirty seconds, then letting it flow slowly into the lithium. Myersdorf says that eventually, the company plans to get rid of the lithium in the battery altogether.

Changing the chemical reactions occurring inside the battery should also improve battery life in long run — allowing thousands of charge cycles instead of hundreds today — while still keeping the same weight and form factor.

The NanoDots have other intriguing qualities too. When embedded into polymer and everyday screens, they can replace the toxic materials like cadmium used in modern displays. They can also be manufactured in different colours, using a special version of basic colours to create a full, rich colour matrix.

StoreDot’s team, at the behest of manufacturers, is using blue backlighting instead of white, and the NanoDots can be used in both LCD an bio-LED screens — or, in Myersdorf’s words: “We can do displays for both Samsung and Apple”, a reference to the different display technologies each company is using today (Apple with LCD, Samsung with organic LED).

StoreDot already has prototype displays in its lab, and showed me this week how it’s lighting a standard iPhone display. There’s not a full colour range yet — only 70 percent — but the company is working towards more than a full NTSC colour gamut. StoreDot future displays are equally free of toxic materials and, as a bonus, they’re flexible too.

The NanoDots also have applications in the pharmaceutical industry as drug delivery agent and could one day replace metals such a gold or silver currently needed to penetrate cell membranes and deliver the active ingredient.

With several patents filed and several more pending, as well as a big smartphone company onboard as an investor, Myersdorf intends to have his company’s products ready for marketing in 2015 and on sale in 2016. But don’t rejoice too much just yet: StoreDot’s new batteries will cost twice as much as the regular ones.

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