Solar paint paves the way for low-cost photovoltaics


072613solar(Nanowerk Spotlight) Using quantum dots as the basis  for solar cells is not a new idea, but attempts to make such devices have not  yet achieved sufficiently high efficiency in converting sunlight to power. The  latest advances in  quantum dots photovoltaics have recently resulted in solar  cell power conversion efficiencies exceeding 7% (see for instance: “Graded Doping for Enhanced Colloidal Quantum Dot  Photovoltaics”).

 

Although these performance levels are promising, all  high-performing device results to date have relied on a multiple-layer-by-layer  strategy for film fabrication rather than employing a single-layer deposition  process.    The attractiveness of using quantum dots for making solar cells  lies in several advantages over other approaches: They can be manufactured in an  energy-saving room-temperature process; they can be made from abundant,  inexpensive materials that do not require extensive purification, as silicon  does; and they can be applied to a variety of inexpensive and even flexible  substrate materials, such as lightweight plastics.

 

In new work, reported in the August 12, 2013 online edition of  Advanced Materials (“Directly Deposited Quantum Dot Solids Using a  Colloidally Stable Nanoparticle Ink”), a research team from the University  of Toronto and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)  developed a semiconductor ink with the goal of enabling the coating of large  areas of solar cell substrates in a single deposition step and thereby  eliminating tens of deposition steps necessary with the previous layer-by-layer  method.

 

“We sought an approach that would achieve highly efficient  utilization of CQD materials,” says Professor Ted Sargent from the  University of Toronto, who, together with Osman Bakr, an  assistant professor in the Solar & Photovoltaics Engineering Research Center at KAUST,  led the work. “To achieve this, we made a solar cell ink that can be deposited  in a single step which makes it an excellent material for high-throughput  commercial fabrication.”

 

The team’s ‘solar paint’ is composed of semiconductor  nanoparticles synthesized in solution – so-called colloidal quantum dots (CQDs).  They can be used to harvest electricity from the entire solar spectrum because  their energy levels can be tuned by simply changing the size of the particle.    Previously, films made from these nanoparticles were built up in  a layer-by-layer fashion where each of the thin CQD film deposition steps is  followed by curing and washing steps to densify the film and form the final  semiconducting material.

 

These additional steps are required to exchange the  long ligands that keep the CQDs stable in solution for short ligands that allow  efficient charge transport. However, this means that many steps are required to  build a thick enough film to absorb enough sunlight.   “We simplified this process by engineering the CQD surfaces with  short organic molecules in the solution phase to enable a stable colloidal  solution and reduce the film formation to a single step,” Bakr explains to  Nanowerk. “At the same time, the post processing steps are reduced  significantly, since the semiconducting material is formed in solution.  This  means that CQD films can be deposited quickly and at low cost, similar to a  paint or ink.”

 

       colloidal quantum dot solar cell fabrication methods

 

a)  Schematic of the standard layer-by-layer spin-coating process with active  materials usage yield and required total material indicated. b) Schematic of the  single-step film process with active materials usage yield and required total  material indicated. (Reprinted with permission from Wiley-VCH Verlag)  

 

 

Besides the reduction in processing steps, the new process is  also much more efficient in terms of materials usage. While the layer-by-layer,  solid-state treatment approach provides less than 0.1% yield in its application  of CQD materials from their solution phase onto the substrate, the new approach  achieves almost 100% use of available CQDs.

 

“This means that for the same amount of CQD material, we could  make a thousand-fold larger area of solar cells compared with conventional  methods,” Bakr points out.  “Our technology paves the way for low-cost  photovoltaics that can be fabricated on flexible substrates using roll-to-roll  manufacturing, similar to a printing press,” adds Lisa Rollny, a PhD candidate  in Sarget’s group and a co-author of the paper. “Our ink is also useful in  biological applications, e.g. in biosensors and tracing agents with an infrared  response.”  

 

“In previous work, we found new routes of passivating the CQD  surface using a combination of organic and inorganic compounds in a solid state  approach with large improvements in efficiency,” says Rollny. “We intend to  integrate this knowledge with our solar CQD ink to further improve the  performance of this material, especially in terms of how much solar energy is  converted into usable electrical energy.”  

 

Although the team have developed an effective method for  producing a CQD film in a single step, the electronic properties of the  resulting films are not optimized yet. This is due to the very small  imperfections on the CQD surface that reduce the usable electricity output of a  solar cell. Through careful engineering of CQD surfaces in solution, the  researchers  plan to eliminate these unwanted surface sites in order to make  higher quality, higher efficiency CQD solar cells using their single step  process.

 

By Michael Berger. Copyright © Nanowerk

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Advances in R2R barrier technologies to Help Plastic Electronics Continuous Production


201306047919620A number of promising barrier technologies that could be used in the industrial production of plastic electronics are being developed for continuous production processes.

Roth & Rau's PECVD tool is used by the Holst Centre for barrier/encapsulation technology developmentFlexible barrier and encapsulation technologies improve the shelf life of devices such as flexible OLED lighting and OPVs from moisture ingress particularly, which tend to cause the technology to degrade.

Requirements for plastic electronics are higher than other technologies as some devices will need a shelf life of several years, while the level of protection can also depend heavily on the application – barrier and encapsulation requirements for a flexible OPV device, used to power an indoor sensor system, will be different to a flexible OLED lighting product, which will differ to an outdoor building- integrated PV (BIPV) application for an OPV panel. In addition high barrier technologies for plastic electronics have to be manufactured cost-effectively.

Plastic electronics R&D clusters in Europe are beginning to make headway in this area. In 2010 plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technology equipment supplier Roth & Rau Microsystems joined the Holst Centre‘s large area flexible electronics programme, specifically to work on roll-to-roll (R2R) deposition tools for transparent high barrier layers.

Progress

OLED lighting devices using the batch-processed thin film flexible barrier technology have been validated in accelerated lifetime tests, while Roth & Rau Microsystems continue to scale the process for R2R.

The Holst Centre’s PECVD barrier technology is also being used in the Solliance project, of which Holst Centre is a founding R&D partner, as a baseline process, for flexible solution processable OPVs, though other barrier technologies and processes that have the potential to be more cost-effective are also being investigated.

In the UK, the Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) is working closely with atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool supplier Beneq. The partners will, together, develop an industry-ready transparent high-barrier/encapsulation process that can be applied using an R2R ALD tool that the CPI has bought from Beneq.

In future, might this mean that the CPI and Beneq are able to collaboratively offer barrier technologies to the plastic electronics industry – Beneq the production tool and CPI the know-how – which may differ depending on devices and applications for devices. Potentially barriers can be applied in several ways, including supplied as a standalone transparent film product that can be laminated onto a device, applied directly onto a device, or applied as a layer on to a film/foil substrate that devices are made on. Investigation and development of these will be done by the CPI.

Solution coating the easy way


201306047919620Researchers in the US and China have developed the first solution-coating technique capable of producing high-quality, large-area single-crystalline organic semiconductor thin films suitable for high-performance, low power and inexpensive printed electronic circuits. The technique, dubbed FLUENCE (fluid-enhanced crystal engineering) can be used to make thin film organic semiconductors with record charge carrier mobilities.

Fluid flow around micropillars

Solution coating of organic semiconductors is an excellent method for making large-area and flexible electronic materials. However, it is not at all good for making aligned single-crystalline thin films – the ideal form for organic semiconductors and that have the best electronic properties. Aligned crystals are preferred in these materials because charge carrier transport through these structures depends on the crystal orientation.

A team led by Zhenan Bao at Stanford University and Stefan Mannsfeld of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is now reporting on a new solution-coating method that can produce high-quality, millimetre-wide and centimetre-long highly aligned single-crystalline organic semiconductor thin films. The essence of FLUENCE is that we are able to control the flow of liquid in which the organic semiconductor is dissolved, explains team member Ying Diao. During fast printing, this “ink” often distributes itself unevenly – something that leads to defects and other structural imperfections quickly appearing in the semiconducting crystals.

FLUENCE tackles this problem from two angles, she says. First, it works using a microstructured printing blade containing tiny pillars that mixes the ink uniformly. Second, specially designed chemical patterns on the substrate prevent the crystals from aligning randomly or “stochastically” in a direction that would be the opposite to that in which printing is taking place. These two methods combined lead to large-area highly aligned single crystalline films that are much more structurally perfect.

To prove that their technique works, the researchers fabricated an organic semiconductor made from TIPS-pentacene, a routinely used and much studied organic semiconductor material, and found a charge carrier mobility of as high as 11 cm2 V−1 s−1. This is the first time a mobility of greater than 10 cm2 V−1 s−1 has been reported for TIPS-pentacene.

“The concepts we have developed in FLUENCE could easily be scaled up and applied to commercial printing methods,” said Diao. “The significant improvement in structural quality and electrical performance of the thin films printed with our method could allow to make higher performance, lower power, small and inexpensive organic circuitry,” she told nanotechweb.org. “We hope that our work will help advance such a morphology-by-design approach to make organic semiconductors for high-performance, large-area printed electronics.”

The team, which includes researchers from Nanjing University in China, says that it will now look at pattering aligned crystals at length scales suitable for making sub-micron devices.

The present work is reported in Nature Materials.

About the author

Belle Dumé is contributing editor at nanotechweb.org.

Why quantum dots can join every aspect of everyday life


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8Nanotechnology is often confined to niche products, but quantum dots are so versatile they could be used in everything from light bulbs to laptops.

 

 

 

 

Sheet of semiconductor crystals

Tiny bits of semiconductor crystals – so-called quantum dots – have such remarkable properties that scientists think they will soon be used in everything from light bulbs to the design of ultra-efficient solar cells. Photograph: Science Photo Library

The properties of a material were once thought to be defined only by its chemical composition. But size matters too, especially for semiconductors. Make crystals of silicon small enough – less than 10 nanometres – and their tiny dimensions can start to dictate how the atoms behave and react in the presence of other things.

These tiny bits of semiconductor crystals – so-called quantum dots – have such remarkable, novel properties that scientists think they will soon be used in everything from light bulbs to imaging of cancer cells or in the design of ultra-efficient solar cells.

Semiconductors such as silicon or indium arsenide are chosen to build electronic circuits because of the discrete energy levels at which they can give off electrons or photons. This makes them useful in building switches, transistors and other devices. It was once thought these energy levels – known as band gaps – were fixed. But shrinking the physical size of the semiconductor material to quantum-dot level seems able to change the band gaps, altering the wavelengths of light the material can emit or changing the energy it takes to change a material from an insulator to a conductor.

Instead of looking for brand new materials to build different devices, then, quantum dots make it possible to use a single type of semiconductor to produce a range of different characteristics. Researchers could tune dots made from silicon to emit a range of different colours in different situations, for example, instead of having to use a range of materials with different chemical compositions.

“The main application for quantum dots at the moment is biological tagging of cells,” says Paul O’Brien, a professor of inorganic materials at the University of Manchester and co-founder of Nanoco Technologies a quantum dot manufacturer also based in Manchester. They are used in the same way as fluorescent dyes, to label agents, he says, but with the advantage that a single laser source can be used to illuminate many different tags each with a specific wavelength.

By attaching different types of quantum dots to proteins that target and attach to specific cell types in the body, these bits of semiconductor can be used by doctors to monitor different kinds of cells. When a laser is then directed on to tagged cells, doctors can see what colour they glow.

The ability to shine also makes quantum dots well suited to produce white light. Existing white bulbs based on low energy light emitting diode (LED) technology tend to produce a garish and bluish form of light that notoriously feels cold, says O’Brien. This is because these LEDs use a phosphor that produces an artificial white light that contains less red wavelengths than natural white light. By embedding quantum dots into a film that is placed over a bulb containing blue LEDs, it is possible to get a much warmer colour of white light. The blue light  from the LED stimulates the quantum dots which, in turn, emit light in a range of colours. Provided you have chosen your dots carefully, these will combine to form white light.

The first of these quantum dot lights hit the market in 2010, a partnership between QD Vision, an MIT spinout in Lexington, Massachusetts, and Nexxus Lighting of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Backlights for laptops, tablets and mobile devices are next in line, and they should appear in products before the end of 2012 says VJ Sahi, head of corporate development at materials design company Nanosys of Palo Alto, California. Besides the colour advantages, quantum-dot-based backlights can be three times more efficient than traditional backlights.

Eventually, says Sahi, quantum dots will do more than just light up displays. The long-term aim is use them to create each red, green and blue sub-pixel that makes up a coloured display. This should produce much brighter colours and consume less power than LCD or even the latest state-of-the-art organic LED (OLED) displays. They should also have no problems with viewing angles, he adds.

The interesting properties of quantum dots come from the fact that they behave like tuning forks for photons, a result of a phenomenon called confinement. At less than 10 nanometres in size – about 50 atoms – they fall within the dimensions of a critical quantum characteristic of the material known as the exciton Bohr radius. The energy levels of electrons within the material’s atoms are constrained and, when a photon or electron hits an atom and excites it, the atom re-emits the energy as a photon of a very specific energy level.

Quantum dots also have another trick up their sleeve. Besides converting photons of one energy into photons of another, they can also be used to release electrons and create electrical currents: in other words they can be used to make solar cells. Arthur Nozik at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, says that quantum-dot solar cells would be much more efficient at converting the energy from photons and therefore boost the amount of power they can produce.

Nanotechnology explained: Nanowires and nanotubes


nanomanufacturing-2Nanowerk News) Nanowires and nanotubes, slender structures that are  only a few billionths of a meter in diameter but many thousands or millions of  times longer, have become hot materials in recent years. They exist in many  forms — made of metals, semiconductors, insulators and organic compounds — and  are being studied for use in electronics, energy conversion, optics and chemical  sensing, among other fields.

id29945
This Scanning Electron Microscope image shows an array of nanowires. (Photo:  Kristian Molhave/Opensource Handbook of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology)

The initial discovery of carbon nanotubes — tiny tubes of pure  carbon, essentially sheets of graphene rolled up unto a cylinder — is generally  credited to a paper published in 1991 by the Japanese physicist Sumio Ijima  (although some forms of carbon nanotubes had been observed earlier). Almost  immediately, there was an explosion of interest in this exotic form of a  commonplace material. Nanowires — solid crystalline fibers, rather than hollow  tubes — gained similar prominence a few years later.
Due to their extreme slenderness, both nanotubes and nanowires  are essentially one-dimensional. “They are quasi-one-dimensional materials,” says MIT associate professor of materials science and engineering Silvija  Gradecak: “Two of their dimensions are on the nanometer scale.” This  one-dimensionality confers distinctive electrical and optical properties.
For one thing, it means that the electrons and photons within  these nanowires experience “quantum confinement effects,” Gradecak says. And  yet, unlike other materials that produce such quantum effects, such as quantum  dots, nanowires’ length makes it possible for them to connect with other  macroscopic devices and the outside world.
The structure of a nanowire is so simple that there’s no room  for defects, and electrons pass through unimpeded, Gradecak explains. This  sidesteps a major problem with typical crystalline semiconductors, such as those  made from a wafer of silicon: There are always defects in those structures, and  those defects interfere with the passage of electrons.
Made of a variety of materials, nanowires can be “grown” on many  different substrates through a vapor deposition process. Tiny beads of molten  gold or other metals are deposited on a surface; the nanowire material, in  vapor, is then absorbed by the molten gold, ultimately growing from the bottom  of that bead as a skinny column of the material. By selecting the size of the  metal bead, it is possible to precisely control the size of the resulting  nanowire.
In addition, materials that don’t ordinarily mix easily can be  grown together in nanowire form. For example, layers of silicon and germanium,  two widely used semiconductors, “are very difficult to grow together in thin  films,” Gradecak says. “But in nanowires, they can be grown without any  problems.” Moreover, the equipment needed for this kind of vapor deposition is  widely used in the semiconductor industry, and can easily be adapted for the  production of nanowires.
While nanowires’ and nanotubes’ diameters are negligible, their  length can extend for hundreds of micrometers, even reaching lengths visible to  the unaided eye. No other known material can produce such extreme  length-to-diameter ratios: millions of times longer than they are wide.
Because of this, the wires have an extremely high ratio of  surface area to volume. That makes them very good as detectors, because all that  surface area can be treated to bind with specific chemical or biological  molecules. The electrical signal generated by that binding can then easily be  transmitted along the wire.
Similarly, nanowires’ shape can be used to produce narrow-beam  lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs), Gradecak says. These tiny light sources  might someday find applications within photonic chips, for example — chips in  which information is carried by light, instead of the electric charges that  relay information in today’s electronics.
Compared to solid nanowires, nanotubes have a more complex  structure: essentially one-atom-thick sheets of pure carbon, with the atoms  arranged in a pattern that resembles chicken wire. They behave in many ways as  one-dimensional materials, but are actually hollow tubes, like a long,  nanometer-scale drinking straw.
The properties of carbon nanotubes can vary greatly depending on  how they are rolled up, a property called chirality. (It’s similar to the  difference between forming a paper tube by rolling a sheet of paper lengthwise  versus on the diagonal: The different alignments of fibers in the paper produce  different strength in the resulting tubes.) In the case of carbon nanotubes,  chirality can determine whether the tubes behave as metals or as semiconductors.
But unlike the precise manufacturing control that is possible  with nanowires, so far methods for making nanotubes produce a random mix of  types, which must be sorted to make use of one particular kind. Besides  single-walled nanotubes, they also exist in double-walled and multi-walled  forms.
In addition to their useful electronic and optical properties,  carbon nanotubes are exceptionally strong, and are used as reinforcing fibers in  advanced composite materials. “In any application where one-dimensionality is  important, both carbon nanotubes and nanowires would provide benefits,” Gradecak  says.
  Source: By David L. Chandler,  MIT

Read more: http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=29945.php#ixzz2QGrCx84G

Read more: http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=29945.php#ixzz2QGr3jbwu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why quantum dots can join every aspect of everyday life


nanomanufacturing-2Nanotechnology is often confined to niche products, but quantum dots are so versatile they could be used in everything from light bulbs to laptops.

 

The properties of a material were once thought to be defined only by its chemical composition. But size matters too, especially for semiconductors. Make crystals of silicon small enough – less than 10 nanometres – and their tiny dimensions can start to dictate how the atoms behave and react in the presence of other things.

These tiny bits of semiconductor crystals – so-called quantum dots – have such remarkable, novel properties that scientists think they will soon be used in everything from light bulbs to imaging of cancer cells or in the design of ultra-efficient solar cells.

Semiconductors such as silicon or indium arsenide are chosen to build electronic circuits because of the discrete energy levels at which they can give off electrons or photons. This makes them useful in building switches, transistors and other devices. It was once thought these energy levels – known as band gaps – were fixed. But shrinking the physical size of the semiconductor material to quantum-dot level seems able to change the band gaps, altering the wavelengths of light the material can emit or changing the energy it takes to change a material from an insulator to a conductor.

Instead of looking for brand new materials to build different devices, then, quantum dots make it possible to use a single type of semiconductor to produce a range of different characteristics. Researchers could tune dots made from silicon to emit a range of different colours in different situations, for example, instead of having to use a range of materials with different chemical compositions.

Sheet of semiconductor crystals

Tiny bits of semiconductor crystals – so-called quantum dots – have such remarkable properties that scientists think they will soon be used in everything from light bulbs to the design of ultra-efficient solar cells. Photograph: Science Photo Library

“The main application for quantum dots at the moment is biological tagging of cells,” says Paul O’Brien, a professor of inorganic materials at the University of Manchester and co-founder of Nanoco Technologies a quantum dot manufacturer also based in Manchester. They are used in the same way as fluorescent dyes, to label agents, he says, but with the advantage that a single laser source can be used to illuminate many different tags each with a specific wavelength.

By attaching different types of quantum dots to proteins that target and attach to specific cell types in the body, these bits of semiconductor can be used by doctors to monitor different kinds of cells. When a laser is then directed on to tagged cells, doctors can see what colour they glow.

The ability to shine also makes quantum dots well suited to produce white light. Existing white bulbs based on low energy light emitting diode (LED) technology tend to produce a garish and bluish form of light that notoriously feels cold, says O’Brien. This is because these LEDs use a phosphor that produces an artificial white light that contains less red wavelengths than natural white light. By embedding quantum dots into a film that is placed over a bulb containing blue LEDs, it is possible to get a much warmer colour of white light. The blue light  from the LED stimulates the quantum dots which, in turn, emit light in a range of colours. Provided you have chosen your dots carefully, these will combine to form white light.

The first of these quantum dot lights hit the market in 2010, a partnership between QD Vision, an MIT spinout in Lexington, Massachusetts, and Nexxus Lighting of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Backlights for laptops, tablets and mobile devices are next in line, and they should appear in products before the end of 2012 says VJ Sahi, head of corporate development at materials design company Nanosys of Palo Alto, California. Besides the colour advantages, quantum-dot-based backlights can be three times more efficient than traditional backlights.

Eventually, says Sahi, quantum dots will do more than just light up displays. The long-term aim is use them to create each red, green and blue sub-pixel that makes up a coloured display. This should produce much brighter colours and consume less power than LCD or even the latest state-of-the-art organic LED (OLED) displays. They should also have no problems with viewing angles, he adds.

The interesting properties of quantum dots come from the fact that they behave like tuning forks for photons, a result of a phenomenon called confinement. At less than 10 nanometres in size – about 50 atoms – they fall within the dimensions of a critical quantum characteristic of the material known as the exciton Bohr radius. The energy levels of electrons within the material’s atoms are constrained and, when a photon or electron hits an atom and excites it, the atom re-emits the energy as a photon of a very specific energy level.

Quantum dots also have another trick up their sleeve. Besides converting photons of one energy into photons of another, they can also be used to release electrons and create electrical currents: in other words they can be used to make solar cells. Arthur Nozik at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, says that quantum-dot solar cells would be much more efficient at converting the energy from photons and therefore boost the amount of power they can produce.

Such applications are many years from becoming commercial reality. But they serve to demonstrate that no material technology stands still; sometimes all you have to do is cut it down to size.

 For More on How “Nanotechnology” and “Quantum Dots” Will Impact the Future, Go To:

10 Ways Nano-Manufacturing Will Alter Industry

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/2013/03/30/10-ways-nanomanufacturing-will-alter-industry/

Quantum Dot and Quantum Dot Display (QLED): Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, Nanotechnology, 2013 to 2019


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8

WinterGreen Research announces that it has published a new study Quantum Dot and Quantum Dot Display (QLED) Market Shares, Strategy, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2013 to 2019. The 2013 study has 221 pages, 80 tables and figures. Quantum dots will cascade into the marketplace. They offer lower cost, longer life, and brighter lighting.

 

According to Susan Eustis, “The commercialization of quantum dots using kilogram quantity mass production is a game-changer. High quality, high quantity and lowest price quantum dots increase product quality in every industry. The rate of change means speeded products cycles are evolving.”

 

Once manufacturers learn to integrate higher efficiency luminescent quantum dots into their products, each vendor will need to follow or dramatically lose market share. This level of change brought by quantum dot and quantum dot displays (QLED) represents a new paradigm that will create new industries, products and jobs in science and industry. The list of possible quantum dot applications is ever expanding. New applications are waiting for the availability of more evolved quantum dots.

Quantum Dot LED (QLED) commercial focus has remained on key optical applications: Optical component lasers are emerging as a significant market. LED backlighting for LCD displays, LED general lighting, and solar power quantum dots are beginning to reach the market. Vendors continue to evaluate other applications.

Quantum dots QDs are minute particles or nano-particles in the range of 2 nm to 10 nm diameter. Quantum dots are tiny bits of semiconductor crystals with optical properties that are determined by their material composition. Their size is small to the nanoparticle level. They are made through a synthesis process. QD Vision synthesizes these materials in solution, and formulates them into inks and films. Quantum Dot LEDs (QLED) enable performance and cost benefits.

The quantum dot cannot be seen with the naked eye, because it is an extremely tiny semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal is a particle having a particle size of less than 10 nanometers. QDs have great potential as light-emitting materials for next-generation displays with highly saturated colors because of high quantum efficiency, sharp spectral resolution, and easy wavelength tenability. Because QDs convert light to current, QDs have uses in other applications, including solar cells, photo detectors, and image sensors.

 

QLED displays are anticipated to be more efficient than LCDs and OLEDs. They are cheaper to make. Samsung estimates that they cost less than half of what it costs to make LCDs or OLED panels. QLED quantum dot display is better than OLED. It is brighter, cheaper, and saves more energy. Energy-savings is a strong feature. Its power consumption is 1/5 to 1/10 of the LCD’s Samsung offers now. Manufacturing costs of a display are less than half of OLED or LCD. It has a significantly longer life than the OLED.

 

QLED quantum dot display uses active matrix to control the opening and closing of the pixels of each color. Quantum dots have to use a thin film transistor. Emission from quantum dots is due to light or electrical stimulation. The quantum dots are able to produce different colors depending on the quantum shape and size used in the production of materials.

 

Dow Electronic Materials, a business unit of The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) and Nanoco Group plc (AIM: NANO) have a global licensing agreement for Nanoco’s cadmium-free quantum dot technology. Under the terms of the agreement, Dow Electronic Materials will have exclusive worldwide rights for the sale, marketing and manufacture of Nanoco’s cadmium-free quantum dots for use in electronic displays.

 

Market Participants

  • Evident Technologies
  • InVisage
  • LG Display
  • Nanoco Technologies
  • Nanoco Group / Dow Chemical
  • Company (NYSE: DOW)
  • Nanoco / Tokyo Electron
  • NanoAxis
  • N-N Labs
  • Nexxus Lighting
  • Quantum Materials Corp
  • Samsung
  • Sigma-A

 

Graphene Commercialisation and Applications: Global Industry and Academia Summit


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8(Nanowerk News) From its high electrical conductivity  and structural strength, graphene has been cited as a “wonder material” with the  potential to revolutionize materials engineering in many different industrial  sectors. While the number of commercial applications for graphene is potentially  unlimited, production scalability must first be established and R&D activity  properly directed to ensure graphene moves out of the lab and into the market.

The Graphene Commercialisation & Applications:  Global Industry & Academia Summit 2013, (25th-26th June, 2013, London),  is the first forum of its kind aimed at establishing the real, commercially  viable industrial applications of graphene, and expediting its role as a  game-changing technology.

With trailblazing companies such as Nokia, Head, Samsung,  Philips, BAE Systems, Sony and Thales, as well as leading academic and research  institutions such as Manchester University, UCLA, Chalmers University, Seoul  National University and Fraunhofer IPA, coming together for the first time to  present their views, this exciting event is a timely opportunity for relevant  stakeholders to evaluate specific industry requirements for graphene, as well as  understanding its’ material capabilities and real world applications.

Senior Business And Scientific Leaders Speaking At The Summit  Include

  • – Jari Kinaret, Professor, Chalmers University and Director, Graphene Flagship  Consortium
  • – James Baker, Managing Director, BAE Systems Advanced Technology Centre
  • – Jani Kivioja, Research Leader, Nokia
  • – Ralf Schwenger, Director R&D Raquetsports, Head Sport
  • – Seungmin Cho, Principal Research Engineer and Group Leader, Samsung Techwin
  • – Byung Hee Hong, Associate Professor, Seoul National University
  • Richard Kaner, Professor of Chemistry, UCLA
  • – Paolo Bondavalli, Head of Nanomaterial Topic, Thales Group
  • – Marcello Grassi, Head of Technology, Spirit AeroSystems Europe
  • – Nuno Lourenco, Head of Technology, UTC Aerospace
  • – York Haemisch, Senior Director Corporate Technologies, Philips Research
  • – Peter Fischer, CTO, Plastic Logic
  • – Antonio Avitabile, Head of Strategic Technology Partnerships, Sony
  • – Ivica Kolaric, Department Head, Fraunhofer IPA
  • – Pradyumna Goli – Research Associate, A.A. Ballandin Nano-Device Laboratory, UC  Riverside
  • – Rahul Nair, Lead Researcher, University of Manchester
  • – Craig Poland, Research Scientist, Institute of Occupational  Medicine

Day One of the Summit will establish graphene’s commercially  viable applications across multiple sectors and the commercialisation roadmap.

Day Two illustrates supply and cost projections as well as  production scalability steps.

Download The Full Agenda And Speaker Faculty  HereThis forum will provide a unique and invaluable opportunity to  gain insights into the opportunities and hindrances presented by graphene. It  will also provide the framework for industry, research and academia to  collaborate in making this revolutionary technological development a market  reality.

Click Here To Register, Saving £200 Per Person By  19th AprilIf you would like more information about joining the exhibition  showcase or require information on group registration discounts, then please  contact the team on +44 (0) 800 098 8489 or email  info@london-business-conferences.co.uk

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Ontario to Provide $50 Million for New Venture Capital Fund


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8The government of Ontario announced yesterday that they have invested $50 million into a new venture capital fund, aimed at stimulating the provinces’ entrepreneurial talent.

Premier Kathleen Wynne was on hand at Toronto-based accelerator Extreme Startups to make the announcement. According to Wynne the fund is necessary to keep high potential, innovative startups form leaving the province.

kathleen-wynne-throne-speech

“For Ontario companies to compete on the world stage, our entrepreneurs need access to capital,” said Wynne. “Our new venture capital fund will help unlock more financing opportunities for these emerging startups, creating the next wave of Ontario-made innovations and Ontario-based jobs.”

The federal government is also pitching in with another $50 million, while Ontario will likely get private investors to bring the fund total to over $300 million. It will be managed by a private sector fund manager to be named.

“The fund is part of the government’s plan to foster the right climate to attract investment, support innovation, create jobs and grow Ontario’s economy,” reads the Ontario government’s website.

The new fund will build on the Ontario Venture Capital Fund, created in 2008. The existing fund has raised $750 million in private capital, generated $3.6 billion worth of economic activity and created over 50,000 jobs.

The move comes after the government of Canada announced in mid January that it would provide $400 million in venture capital funding. That decision was highly praised by several VC leaders and bloggers throughout Canada, including iNovia’s Chris Arsenault and Version One Ventures’ Boris Wertz.

For Wynne the moves comes as a needed step forward in insuring that Ontario startups grow in Ontario. “Companies, if they can’t get access to capital here in Ontario, they will go somewhere else,” she said. “We want the best ideas and the most innovative companies to stay right here in Ontario.”

International partnership between New York State and the State of Israel to grow nanotechnology industry


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8(Nanowerk News) Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today  announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to establish an  international partnership between New York State and the State of Israel,  through a collaboration involving the College of Nanoscale Science and  Engineering (CNSE) and the Israeli Industry Center for Research &  Development (MATIMOP), that will significantly expand business, technology, and  economic relations in the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, while enabling  billions of dollars in new investments and the creation of thousands of  high-tech jobs in New York and Israel.
“I am so proud of the partnership between the State of Israel  and College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, which continues to be the  leader in the global nanotechnology industry,” said Governor Cuomo. “This  partnership will strengthen our state’s relationship with the State of Israel,  while also investing in a thriving industry that will create jobs and expand the  economy right here in New York.”
Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy said, “This partnership is yet  another example of how Governor Cuomo has strengthened New York State’s global  reputation as an attractive place to do business and create jobs. I thank the  State of Israel for partnering with New York State to ensure the continued  growth of the global nanotechnology industry. New York State is at the forefront  of this industry, and I commend Dr. Alain Kaloyeros for his leadership and hard  work on this agreement. Through this partnership, the College of Nanoscale  Science and Engineering can continue to drive this emerging and rapidly growing  field.”
Nili Shalev, Israel’s Economic Minister to North America, said, “This agreement is the first significant step to stimulate scientific and  industrial collaboration in areas where both states excel. The partnership will  enable Israeli companies access to CNSE’s renowned facilities and collaborate  with leading American and multinational companies on campus. It introduces many  other opportunities, including industrial R&D and commercialization joint  ventures, natural synergy between the two G450 Consortia of both states, and the  enhancement of academic research in Nano scaling. I would like to congratulate  Governor Cuomo, Lt. Governor Duffy and Dr. Alain Kaloyeros, the CEO of CNSE, for  supporting this initiative.”
Dan Vilenski, Former Chairman of Applied Materials’ Israeli  subsidiary and Board member of the Israeli National Nanotechnology Initiative,  said, “Nanotechnology is one of the major areas in which both Israel and New  York have a great deal to offer. Israel is the leader in metrology and  inspection in the semiconductor market, and the State of New York has built one  of the leading facilities in the world for Nano scaling research and will play a  significant role in shaping the future of this industry.”
State University of New York Chancellor Nancy Zimpher said, “The  governor has fostered an innovation environment in New York that is drawing top  scientists from around the world, and through SUNY’s globally renowned  NanoCollege, the potential for advancement and discovery is limitless. Only a  world-class university system like SUNY can generate an international  collaboration and investment of this magnitude. I want to welcome our new  Israeli partners to New York and to the SUNY system. I am sure our combined  expertise and passion for academic excellence and high tech innovation will  yield tremendous results.”
CNSE Senior Vice President and CEO Dr. Alain Kaloyeros said, “As  further testament to the pioneering leadership, strategic vision, and critical  investments of Governor Andrew Cuomo, which have truly established New York as  the epicenter for the global nanotechnology industry, the NanoCollege is  delighted to enter into this partnership with the most prestigious Israeli  Industry Center. In harnessing the power of nanotechnology innovation to bring  together corporate and university partners from the U.S. and Israel, this  collaboration sets the stage for leading-edge advances in nanoscale  technologies, and opens the door for high-tech growth that will provide exciting  career and economic opportunities for individuals and companies across the New  New York.”
The partnership announced today between CNSE and MATIMOP, acting  on behalf of the Office of the Chief Scientist (OCS) in the ministry of Industry  Trade and Labor, builds on and leverages the multi-billion dollar investments in  New York’s nanotechnology industry under the leadership of Governor Cuomo. This  partnership will facilitate and promote bilateral and multilateral research,  development, and commercialization programs in innovative nanoscale technologies  between corporations and academic institutions in the U.S. and Israel.
Through the agreement, the Israeli government has allocated up  to $300 million a year to fund access for Israeli companies and universities to  CNSE’s state-of-the-art 300mm wafer and 450mm wafer infrastructure, facilities,  resources, and know-how, which are unparalleled worldwide. In addition, a  publicity and marketing campaign is being prepared to generate interest and  participation from Israel’s corporate and academic entities.
The centerpiece of the collaboration is the NanoCollege, the  most advanced nanotechnology education, research, development, and deployment  enterprise in the world. With more than $14 billion in high-tech investments,  over 300 global corporate partners, and a footprint that spans upstate New York,  CNSE is uniquely positioned to support this first-of-its-kind partnership.
The agreement is designed to enable a host of nanotechnology  research and development (R&D), prototyping, demonstration and  commercialization activities, including the facilitation of partnerships to spur  collaborative projects targeting industrial R&D and commercialization;  exchange of technical information and expertise to promote global development of  next-generation nanoscale technologies; and the organization of joint seminars  and workshops to enhance cooperation between corporate and academic entities in  New York and Israel.
Specific technology areas targeted for initial collaboration  include sub-systems, sensors and accessories for deployment in the nanoscale  cleanroom environment; simulation and modeling for next-generation tools and  technologies; and tools, processes, and testing technologies essential to  accelerate critical innovations in the multiple fields enabled by  nanotechnology, including nanoelectronics, energy, and health care, among  others.
Congressman Paul Tonko said, “This partnership between New York  State and Israel is yet further proof that the Capital Region is not only  renowned on a national stage, but indeed on the world stage. Clean energy  innovation jobs and long-term economic growth require investments, and Tech  Valley laid that foundation years ago. As a fast-growing region for high tech  jobs and all the ancillary benefits that follow, these sorts of partnerships led  by Governor Cuomo will ensure we remain a bright spot for continued education,  research, development and deployment by some of the most cutting edge  innovators, entrepreneurs, small businesses and large companies in the world.”
Senator Neil D. Breslin said, “This is a fantastic partnership  between New York State and the State of Israel that will create jobs, further  leverage a proven investment, and continue to let the Capital Region shine as  the forefront of the nanotechnology industry. I commend Governor Cuomo for  championing the growth in nanotechnology in New York, and the State of Israel  for choosing to enter into this great partnership.”
Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy said, “I am pleased that this  partnership between New York State and the State of Israel will not only create  jobs, but add immensely to a much-needed boost of economic development in the  Capital Region. I congratulate the Governor for bringing global attention to New  York State in the field of nanotechnology, and the State of Israel for choosing  to do business in New York.”
Mayor Jerry D. Jennings said, “I applaud Governor Cuomo for his  leadership in developing Albany’s nanotechnology sector, and thank the State of  Israel and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering for their hard work  in making this partnership a reality. This is great news for the Capital Region,  which has already seen immense growth in this industry, and I look forward to  ensuring that this progress continues.”
Albany County Executive Daniel McCoy said, “Governor Cuomo has  done a great job leading the way toward greater economic development, and this  partnership between New York State and the State of Israel is just another  example. I applaud the Governor, the State of Israel, and the College of  Nanoscale Science and Engineering for their hard work in developing this  partnership that will spur job creation, economic development, and greater  international attention for our state.”
Source: College of Nanoscale Science and  Engineering

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