Samsung set to ditch lithium ion batteries for graphene, and here’s why


Samsung phones will have super fast graphene, rather than lithium, batteries within the next two years.

According to leaker Evan Blass, Samsung is developing graphene batteries for its smartphones — and we could see the first ones arrive as soon as next year.

The reason for the change is clear: exceptionally fast charging. Reportedly a full charge will now take just half an hour on a graphene battery, and despite recent leaps forward in fast-charging that would still be a significant improvement on the standard lithium ion battery.

The news is the latest update we’ve heard since Samsung reported in 2017 that they had developed a graphene ball that could charge 5x faster than standard phone batteries (reported by Cnet). So why is it taking so long for the batteries to make it onto the market? Blass surmises that’s it’s simply a question of economics: “they still need to raise capacities while lowering costs.” Once that balance is found, this tech innovation could be a true game changer.

This news comes shortly after the release of Samsung’s latest flagship phablet, the Galaxy Note 10. It boasts an impressive 3500mAh battery, while it’s big brother — the Galaxy Note 10 Plus — has a whopping capacity of 4300mAh. But they’re not just about batteries. While both run on the powerful Exynos 9825 chip, specifications diverge significantly. The Galaxy note 10 has an 6.3-inch 1080 x 2280 resolution screen, with 8GB of RAM and a triple camera set-up; meanwhile, the Galaxy Note 10 Plus has an even larger 6.8-inch screen with a sharper 1440 x 3040 resolution, 12GB of RAM, and its triple rear camera is complemented with a Time of Flight 3D sensor.

With all the recent innovations in smartphone batteries, from huge capacities to Qi wireless charging, you might have thought there was nowhere else to innovate. But graphene technology could point towards an era of even faster charging. All that’s left to be seen is how pricey is it, and whether the capacity will be enough to satisfy demanding users.

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India’s first foldable phone in 2019 will be a Samsung Galaxy, A50 with Infinity-O also in pipeline … What Will this Mean to the’Flexible Electronics Markets’?


Galaxy_fold

The foldable Samsung smartphone will demand an extremely higher price for its foldable display technology. The Galaxy A50 will also bring the Infinity-O display technology to the Indian market.

  • Rumours have stated that Samsung will either use a Snapdragon 855 or an Exynos 9820 chipset.
  • Samsung said at the time that the phone will act as a conventional smartphone when folded with is a smaller display panel.
  • The Galaxy A50 will be the first smartphone in India to offer Samsung’s Infinity-O display featuring narrow bezels.

Since Samsung showed off the foldable smartphone at the Samsung Developer Conference in October 2018, the world has been eager to see Samsung’s premium lineup for 2019. The Galaxy A8s unveiled a few weeks ago showed off the Infinity-O display with narrow bezels all around. Therefore, consumers are looking forward to an exciting smartphone lineup from Samsung for this year for the Indian markets. The good news is that India will also be one of the first few markets to enjoy Samsung’s latest and greatest.

According to a report from MySmartPrice, Samsung will unveil both the Galaxy Fold and Galaxy A50 within the next few months and India will witness them soon after. The Galaxy Fold will come to Indian market a few after weeks its launch in European markets. Rumours have stated that Samsung will either use a Snapdragon 855 or an Exynos 9820 chipset for powering the foldable smartphones. Additionally, it could feature 8GB RAM and 128GB internal storage.

At the SDC 2018, Samsung mentioned that they were working with Google to optimise Android for the new foldable form factor. The optimisation with Google will make all apps, as well as the entire Android interface, adapt to the newer display. Samsung said at the time that the phone will act as a conventional smartphone when folded with is a smaller display panel. When unfolded, the device will reveal a large tablet-like display for a bigger viewing experience.

It is also known that the Galaxy Fold will feature dual batteries. Each half of the device will contain a battery, which means the Galaxy Fold could end up having a total battery capacity of up to 6000mAh. This would be necessary considering the demanding nature of the hardware as well as the software. The report also states a probable price for the Galaxy Fold. Samsung could eventually end offering the most expensive smartphones in its history by selling the Galaxy Fold for around $2,000 (approximately Rs 1,50,000). The device would be available in limited numbers as well.

Apart from the Galaxy Fold, Samsung will also bring the much-awaited Galaxy A50 to the Indian market. The A50 will be the first smartphone in India to offer Samsung’s Infinity-O display featuring narrow bezels. The panel will be Samsung’s Super AMOLED one rendering a full HD+ pixel resolution. The A50 is also rumoured to sport an in-display fingerprint sensor. Underneath, the A50 will be powered by an Exynos 9610 chipset accompanied by 4GB RAM and offered with a choice of either 64GB or 128GB storage variants. The A50 will be powered by Samsung’s OneUI based on Android 9 Pie out of the box. The A50 is also expected to kept alive by a 4000mAh battery.

The Galaxy A50 will be a midrange smartphone in India, with prices expected to start under Rs 25,000. The A50 is expected to be announced a few weeks after the Galaxy S10 is unveiled. The Infinity-O display is expected to trickle down to other budget Samsung smartphones in the future as well.

Tenka Energy, Inc. Building Ultra-Thin Energy Dense SuperCaps and NexGen Nano-Enabled Pouch & Cylindrical Batteries – Energy Storage Made Small and POWERFUL! YouTube Video
** A ‘Flex-form high Power density and Cycle Life battery from Tenka Energy could be just what this phone will need to EXCEL! **

Quantum Dots and Lipid Rafts: Analytical Chemistry Solves a Nanoscale Mystery


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Article from Sustainable Nano

 

Remember all those great Black Friday deals on QLED televisions? You may not realize it, but they were all about nanotechnology!

The Q in QLED stands for quantum dots, which are not only being used to enhance the displays of TVs, but also are used in solar cells, medical imaging, and sensing.1-3 However, the disposal of these particles is not well regulated, leading to concern over their release into the environment. In the frenzy of holiday shopping, have you ever stopped to wonder what could happen if a quantum dot lands on the surface of a cell?

QLED

Figure 1. The “Q” in QLED TV stands for quantum dot (image by Samsung Newsroom)

As an analytical chemist, my mind is constantly blown by the suite of analytical tools that we have in the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology to study really hard scientific questions like this one. I recently used two of these analytical tools, the atomic force microscope(AFM) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to tackle the tricky question about quantum dots on a cell surface. In our study, we looked at how quantum dots interact with supported lipid bilayers, which (as we explained in a previous blog post) we can use as a mimic of the cell membrane. The paper was called “Quaternary Amine-Terminated Quantum Dots Induce Structural Changes to Supported Lipid Bilayers.” 4

Q dots

Figure 2. The goal of this work was to understand the impact of quantum dots on supported lipid bilayers, which are a mimic for the outer membrane of cells. (image by Arielle Mensch)

 

Let me break down why this problem is so tricky and why it required really fancy tools to be able to study it. Everything we were studying was too small to be seen by eye or even using regular microscopes – the nanoparticles were about 6 nm and the lipid bilayers were about 4-5 nm – so we needed to use tools that allowed us to really zoom in to the nanoscale to get an idea of what was happening. Furthermore, the cell membrane of an organism is naturally wet, so we needed tools to allow us to work in liquids. Finally, the interactions between nanoparticles and membranes are dynamic, meaning they can change from moment to moment, so we really wanted to use tools that allowed us to monitor the interactions of the quantum dots and bilayers over time and not just take a single snapshot.

single image.png

Figure 3. Only capturing a single image doesn’t necessarily tell you everything you need to know about a situation… (image by Axel Naud)

 

With these requirements in mind, I set out to design a system that we could use to understand these interactions in liquid and in real time. We chose to work with supported lipid bilayers that contain something called phase-segregated domains, or “lipid rafts.” These lipid rafts are found in the cell membranes of different organisms, from plants to animals to bacteria, and are important for moving things in and out of the cell, which makes them very interesting to study. Furthermore, my collaborator, Dr. Eric Melby, previously showed that 4-nm, positively charged gold nanoparticles attached more  to supported lipid bilayers that had lipid rafts than those that didn’t (you can read more about his work here). This suggested that lipid rafts may play an important role in nanoparticle interactions with cell membranes, which was something I wanted to explore further with different types of nanoparticles, namely quantum dots.

 

lipid raft

Figure 4. We used supported lipid bilayers either with or without lipid rafts to understand the impact of quantum dots on these types of bilayers. (image adapted from Mensch et al.4 with permission from the American Chemical Society)

 

To start, I used Eric’s method of forming supported lipid bilayers either with or without lipid rafts using quartz crystal microbalance. As I’ve described previously, QCM is a very sensitive balance that uses a quartz crystal to measure changes in frequency, which we can use to figure out changes in mass. For example, if we add quantum dots to a bilayer formed on the quartz crystal and notice that the frequency starts to decrease, this tells us that the bilayer is getting heavier because the added quantum dots are sticking to it.

In my experiments, we saw that when we added quantum dots to bilayers with or without lipid rafts the frequency decreased over time (Figure 5). This told us that the quantum dots were attaching to our bilayers. Interestingly, when we rinsed the bilayer with buffer (to get rid of any loosely attached quantum dots), we first saw a decrease of mass (likely due to quantum dots leaving the bilayer) and then saw another increase in mass before the measurement leveled off. This was the first time that we had observed this type of change using QCM before. We hypothesized that this was due to the quantum dots causing some sort of restructuring of the bilayer, such as holes, multilayers, or a combination of events. But with QCM alone, we were unable to say for certain what was happening.

 

QCM.png

Figure 5. By QCM we saw that the quantum dots attached to the lipid bilayers. However, interesting frequency shifts after the rinse suggested that something more complicated was going on with these interactions. (image adapted from Mensch et al.4 with permission from the American Chemical Society)

 

Because we were uncertain what impact the quantum dots were having on the structure of the bilayer, we decided to use another analytical technique to get an actual picture of what was happening. This time we used atomic force microscopy (AFM). This technique allows us to study these interactions in liquid and over time, which if you remember were two very key factors to this work. I’ve described AFM in detail previously here, but briefly AFM works by using a very sharp tip that is attached at the end of a cantilever. We line up a laser to the end of this tip, which reflects off the tip onto a sensitive detector. As the tip scans across the sample, the laser light will move up or down on the detector depending on the height of the sample. From these changes in the laser’s position, we’re able to determine how tall features of the sample are.

 

AFM.png

Figure 6. Atomic force microscopy allows us to visualize the interaction of quantum dots and supported lipid bilayers in liquid and in real time. (image by Arielle Mensch)

 

For the first part of our AFM experiment, we formed lipid bilayers with lipid rafts. These rafts are about 1 nm taller than the other part of the bilayer. You can see this in Figure 7, where the brighter regions of the bilayer are the lipid rafts.

 

AFM lipid rafts

Figure 7. Lipid rafts within a supported lipid bilayer are ~1 nm taller than the surrounding regions of the bilayer. The 2-micrometer scale bar equals 2,000 nanometers, and the axis on the left shows you how the brightness of each region corresponds to a height in nanometers. (image adapted from Mensch et al.4 with permission from the American Chemical Society)

 

To investigate the impact of quantum dots on these bilayers, we added quantum dots to the bilayers and collected AFM images over time. This allowed us to monitor the changes to the structure of the bilayers. Figure 8 shows what we found – and it was pretty neat!

 

afm images.png

Figure 8. Sequence of AFM images showing the disappearance of lipid rafts over 15 min. The blue arrows are pointing to the lipid rafts or disappearance of lipid rafts in the images. The axis on the right shows you how the brightness of each region corresponds to a height in nanometers. (image adapted from Mensch et al.4with permission from the American Chemical Society))

 

When we added quantum dots to the lipid bilayers, the lipid rafts shrank and eventually disappeared! It only took about 15 minutes for them to completely disappear. You can see this by following the blue arrows in Figure 8. The other bright regions in the images are quantum dots binding to the bilayers and inducing structural changes (increasing the height in these regions or burrowing into the bilayer). These two changes are consistent with the mass changes we saw using QCM. We believe that the lipid rafts collapse because of an increase in energy due to the addition of the quantum dots. Basically, it is easier for the lipid rafts to mix together with the other components in the bilayer rather than stay separated.

 

Schematic

Figure 9. Schematic showing how positively charged quantum dots can cause the collapse of lipid rafts in supported lipid bilayers. (image adapted from Mensch et al.1 with permission from the American Chemical Society)

 

So, you might be wondering what all of this means. Well, to summarize, we found that positively charged quantum dots attach to supported lipid bilayers either with or without lipid rafts present. They also cause restructuring of the bilayers. In particular, when lipid rafts were present, the quantum dots actually caused the collapse of these important cell membrane components. Lipid rafts are found in the cell membranes of many different organisms, so this could have important implications in figuring out how nanoparticles affect different organisms.

But like with all good studies, there are still many more questions to explore! For this study we used supported lipid bilayers, but it would be really interesting to look at lipid rafts naturally within the cell membranes of actual organisms to see if we see the same effects. Furthermore, we can consider different types of nanoparticles with different surface coatings and see if that changes the results. So, the next time I see a QLED TV at the store, I’ll be sure to admire its beautiful colors, but I’ll also be thinking about my next research project.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


REFERENCES

  1. Martynenko, I. V.; Litvin, A. P.; Purcell-Milton, F.; Baranov, A. V.; Fedorov, A. V.; Gun’ko, Y. K. Application of semiconductor quantum dots in bioimaging and biosensing. Materials Chemistry B, 2017, 5, 6701−6727. doi: 10.1039/C7TB01425B
  2. Rühle, S.; Shalom, M.; Zaban, A. Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells. ChemPhysChem2010, 11, 2290−304. doi: 10.1002/cphc.201000069
  3. Medintz, I. L.; Uyeda, H. T.; Goldman, E. R.; Mattoussi, H. Quantum dot bioconjugates for imaging, labelling and sensing. Nature Materials, 2005, 4, 436-446. doi: 10.1038/nmat1390
  4. Mensch, A.C., Buchman, J.T., Haynes, C.L., Pedersen, J.A., Hamers, R.J. Quaternary amine-terminated quantum dots induce structural changes to supported lipid bilayers. Langmuir, 2018, 34, 12369-12378. DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b02047

Samsung to unveil quantum dot curved monitor at IFA


Samsung Curved QD 082916 cf791-qd-curved-monitor2

The South Korean tech giant is putting its curved display armed with quantum dots (QD) on its new gaming monitors to be unveiled at the upcoming IFA tradeshow.

They’re the first QD materials, or semiconductor nanocrystals, for Samsung to apply to monitors. The company has said previously that it wanted to expand QD use outside of TVs.

The CFG70 series has an 1800R curvature with a 1 m/s moving picture response time and a rapid refresh rate of up to 144Hz. It comes with the company’s own Gaming UX OSD interface, which provides an on-screen dashboard that allows users to configure settings.

Gameplay settings can be adjusted through hot keys at the front and the back of the monitor.

The larger CF791 has a curvature of 1500R, the most curved gaming monitor on the market. It has a refresh rate of 100Hz and has AMD FreeSync Technology that synchronizes the rate with AMD’s graphic cards. The monitor has a 21:9 ratio.

Samsung said the “boundless” design will allow gamers to focus on the screen, rather than the display.

“As the gaming market continues to enjoy rapid worldwide growth, gamers expect advanced display technologies that can bring out the latest video game features and optimize the gameplay experience,” said Seog-gi Kim, SVP of Samsung’s Visual Display Business, in a statement.

“By enhancing our pioneering curved gaming monitors with quantum dot technology, our CFG70 and CF791 displays further surround players and make them feel as if they are part of the game. We are excited to demonstrate this futuristic and immersive gaming environment at IFA 2016,” he added.

Samsung is reportedly working on applying curvable screens for future smartphones, and may use the technology to create a phone and tablet 2-in-1 device.

See Also: What Are Quantum Dots, and Why Do I Want Them in My TV?

Nanosys-Green-QD-on-blue-BLU1-660x495 (1)

Using graphene, Samsung could nearly double battery capacities


1-Brain Transparentgraphene1-640x353Growing graphene cells directly on silicon in the lab has boosted energy density of batteries by 1.8 times compared to conventional batteries.

For all of the progress we’ve made with mobile devices, they’re still limited by relatively older technology. Namely: The batteries that power them typically get us through a day or so.

 Samsung’s research group may be on to something that nearly doubles that run-time by expanding the energy density — the amount of stored power in a given area — to 1.8 times of current batteries.

On Friday, Neowin noted that the research team published its experimental findings, explaining how it achieved this result in the labs.

Samsung’s team used silicon anodes in lieu of graphite ones; an approach many efforts in this space have taken. The challenge here though is that the silicon can expand or contract during the battery charging and discharging cycles.

To counter that, Samsung’s team created a process to grow graphene cells directly on the silicon in layers that can adjust to allow for the silicon’s expansion:

“The graphene layers anchored onto the silicon surface accommodate the volume expansion of silicon via a sliding process between adjacent graphene layers. When paired with a commercial lithium cobalt oxide cathode, the silicon carbide-free graphene coating allows the full cell to reach volumetric energy densities of 972 and 700 Wh l-1 at first and 200th cycle, respectively, 1.8 and 1.5 times higher than those of current commercial lithium-ion batteries.”

While the technology sounds promising, keep in mind that this is just a research project. Any commercial implementation won’t happen quickly, so for now, you’ll have to keep plugging in that phone, tablet or watch every night.

3M Showcases High-Performance Solutions for Consumer Electronics Industry at CES: QDEF (Quanum Dot Enhancement Film)


ces-765LAS VEGAS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–3M Electronics is exhibiting some of the company’s industry-leading solutions for the consumer electronics industry during the 2014 International CES, taking place Jan. 7-10 in Las Vegas. CES attendees are also invited to get a free 3M Privacy Screen Protector applied to their iPhone® 4S or iPhone® 5 Tuesday through Thursday, from 11 a.m. to noon (PST) while learning more about the 3M technologies below at booth number 30459.

Screen privacy and protection products

The latest in screen privacy for mobile and desktop devices from 3M will be showcased and in particular, a key solution to the emerging data security risk of corporate information access on mobile devices. A proprietary micro-louver technology from 3M lets the user see a clear image, while showing a dark, blank screen to anyone viewing the display from a side angle. 3M screen privacy and protection solutions are available for tablets, smartphones, laptops, and monitors, as well as for managing light in industrial and automotive applications. Other booth displays include a larger-than-life 3M™ Privacy Screen Protector, and the full line of 3M™ Privacy and Screen Protector products, plus the newly-introduced 3M™ Easy-On Privacy Filters for iPads®, with an interactive attachment wall. Learn more at www.3mscreens.com.

Dot enhancement film

Devices such as smartphones, tablets and televisions can be made lighter, brighter and more energy efficient with 3M™ Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF). The new product from 3M allows up to 50 percent more color than current levels in liquid crystal display (LCD) devices. 3M has teamed with Nanosys, Inc. to produce the 3M QDEF solution.

Presently, LCDs typically are limited to displaying 35 percent or less of the visible color spectrum, resulting in a viewing experience that can be vastly different than what a person sees in the real world. The wider color gamut displays available through the new 3M film let consumers enjoy more visceral, more immersive, and truer-to-life color. Learn more at 3M.com/color. Nanoco nano_0

Touch screen films

3M recently announced new films to help touch screen manufacturers and integrators meet the growing demand for touch-enabled consumer electronics.

  • 3M™ Patterned Metal Mesh Film enables new design possibilities, such as curved and foldable touch screens, allowing OEMs and ODMs to create the next generation of touch-enabled smartphones, notebooks and tablets.
  • 3M™ Patterned Silver Nanowire Film combines the expertise of two leading technology and manufacturing companies – 3M and Cambrios Technologies Corporation – to provide the quality and volume that touch screen manufacturers demand. The flexible film can conform to angles and rounded surfaces, enabling next-generation curved and rollable touch sensors.
  • 3M™ ITO Film and 3M™ Advanced ITO Film offer excellent optical transparency, high conductivity and product quality at competitive prices.

3M plans to ramp up its global touch sensor film manufacturing capacity to more than 600,000 square meters per month, in aggregate, to support the growing demand for consumer touch-enabled devices, such as smartphones, tablets, laptops, all-in-ones (AIO) and monitors. Learn more at 3MTouch.com/films.

Touch displays and systems

3M showcases its latest multi-touch solutions for interactive digital signage applications, including a new 42-inch multi-touch display, large-format multi-touch systems and downloadable multi-display/multi-touch software. Learn more at 3M.com/multitouch.

Design-enabling materials for a new generation of electronic displays

3M will also showcase a variety of industry-specific materials that help maximize the functionality, reliability and productivity of electronic displays, enabling brighter, lighter, thinner, state-of-the-art devices. 3M Optically Clear Adhesives (OCAs), Liquid Optically Clear Adhesives (LOCAs), Electronic Assembly Tapes, and Contrast Enhancement Films will be featured as part of the 3M Electronics display. Based on core 3M adhesive technology, 3M Optically Clear Adhesives are precision-manufactured to virtually eliminate common adhesive visual defects such as bubbling, which can distort the display and diminish consumer satisfaction with their device.

3M OCA’s meet certain specific display bonding requirements with the unique ability to customize the functionality, reactivity and performance of the adhesive. 3M’s collaborative culture and bench-to-bench approach, combined with electronics materials expertise, breadth of product portfolio and alignment with key consumer electronics industry leaders provides many innovative answers to demanding industry needs.

About 3M Electronics

3M Electronics provides a wide array of innovative products and systems that enable greater speed, brightness and flexibility in today’s electronic devices, while addressing industry needs for increased thinness, sustainability and longevity. Using the most recent R&D advances in materials and science, 3M offers technology, materials and components to create exceptional visual experiences; enable semiconductor processes and consumer electronics devices, and enhance and manage signals. 3M Electronics enables the digitally enhanced lifestyle of today and tomorrow. Learn more at: http://www.3Melectronics.com.

About 3M

3M captures the spark of new ideas and transforms them into thousands of ingenious products. Our culture of creative collaboration inspires a never-ending stream of powerful technologies that make life better. 3M is the innovation company that never stops inventing. With $30 billion in sales, 3M employs 88,000 people worldwide and has operations in more than 70 countries. For more information, visit www.3M.com or follow @3MNews on Twitter.

UPDATE: Nanoco Confirms LG Deal As Nanosys Retracts Samsung Claim


GreenerLEDLONDON (Alliance News) – Nanoco Group PLC on Friday said South Korean electronics group LG Electronics has signed a deal with The Dow Chemical Co for the supply of Nanoco’s cadmium-free quantum dots for its Ultra HD TV range, as rival Nanosys issued a retraction to information on its deal with Samsung Electronics which sent shares in Nanoco plunging lower earlier this week.

The new range of TVs from LG was launched at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week. The deal confirms a previous announcement from Nanoco that LG would use its quantum dot technology on its 4K TV line-up.

Nanoco did not provide any financial details on the contract. Nanoco nano_0

Quantum dots are nanocrystals made of semiconductor materials, which can be used in solar cells, LEDs and diode lasers. Nanoco’s quantum dots do not contain cadmium – a heavy metal that is restricted under European and other territories environmental legislation.

The confirmation of the deal with LG comes after shares in Nanoco dropped heavily earlier this week after Samsung Electronics unveiled new TVs at the CES event which were said to use technology from Nanoco’s rival Nanosys. Nanoco shares dropped around 18% after the Nanosys announcement on Tuesday.

On Friday, however, Nanosys issued a retraction to that statement, clarifying that its deal with Samsung only covers the patents on its quantum dot technology, not its products or technology.

Broker Liberum said this retraction is in line with its suggestion earlier in the week that Samsung will source the quantum dots for its next generation TVs in-house and reinforces its view that Samsung is likely to sign a deal with Dow for quantum dot supply in future.

“We are delighted that LG has entered a formal partnering agreement with Dow, which has the scale and expertise to meet LG’s quantum dot requirements,” said Nanoco Chief Executive Officer Michael Edelman.

Nanoco shares were up 1.3% to 118.00 pence on Friday morning.

Market Opportunities for Quantum Dots 2015-2022


Applications-of-Nanomaterials-Chart-Picture1SUMMARY

NanoMarkets believes that opportunities for commercial use of quantum dots (QDs) have changed dramatically in the past year, and this, our most recent report on QDs, identifies where the money will be made as the a result of these new trends and developments.
QDs have now exploded onto the commercial display market and are appearing in displays of all sizes, enabling LCDs with greater color gamut and lower power consumption. These QD-enhanced LCDs are already providing direct competition to OLED displays, raising the question of whether OLED displays will ever take off in the way that was once hoped.  At the same time NanoMarkets believes that ability of the QD makers to supply sufficient materials to support future growth is no longer an issue.  
3D Printing dots-2
As a result of these trends, the granular eight-year forecasts of volume shipments and revenue generated contained in this report reflect NanoMarkets growing bullishness about QDs.  We have also considered how the QD supply chain is likely to change as the competition between QD suppliers to get the attention of major OEMs increases.
Most of the revenue generation from QDs will come from the display industry for the next few years. This is where the money is, and although 2014 saw the introduction of several QD-enhanced LCDs by a number of OEMs, QDs have still penetrated only a very small portion of the LCD market as yet.
Potential growth is huge and in the next three to eight years NanoMarkets believe that the QD industry will build upon its success in displays and expand into other commercial applications.  These newer markets are also analyzed in this report.  NanoMarkets thinks that solid-state lighting, with similar technical requirements to displays, will be the next to market. In the longer term we see potential for commercial development of QDs in solar cells and as fluorescent biomarkers, though both applications currently face substantial technical hurdles. Semiconductor diode lasers are also a potentially important application for QDs.
In this report, NanoMarkets discusses opportunities in QDs for companies throughout the supply chain – from QD suppliers to LED component makers to OEMs – and predicts how moves by these companies will affect the growth of the QD industry. We also look at the state of QD technology and what improvements will be needed to enable further growth.

– See more at: http://nanomarkets.net/market_reports/report/market-opportunities-for-quantum-dots-2015-2022#sthash.K8ykFzpT.dpuf

LG and Samsung Announce Quantum Dot TV: Market to Reach $9.6 BILLION by 2023


Hisense%20Quantum%20Dot%20ULEDLG announced quantum dot TV; quantum dot market forecast December 16, 2014. Today LG announced it’ll showcase its quantum dot TV at the upcoming CES 2015. We also expect Samsung to show quantum dot TV. Quantum dot could improve Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) dramatically in terms of color gamut, color accuracy and reducing power consumption.

QD-market-forecast-chart

Figure. Quantum dot display and lighting market forecast Source: Touch Display Research “Quantum dot display and lighting technologies and market forecast report”.

This is one of the biggest breakthrough technologies for LCD in recent several years. Now quantum dot LCD is challenging AMOLED. Touch Display Research surveyed many quantum dot suppliers and found that the quantum dot display component market surpassed $70 million in 2013.

We forecast that the quantum dot display and lighting component market will reach $9.6 billion by 2023. Touch Display Research will be at CES 2015 and report about all quantum dot displays and lighting.

LG Display Ready to Mass Produce Flexible OLED Panels for Smartphones, to Introduce Products Next Year


lg flexible display oled

 

*** Note to “Great Things from Small Things” Readers: Tangent to this story readers should also read our blog on “QLED Technology” (Quantum Dot Enabled) (See Below) coming into this marketplace in the future. The tech has the potential of not only accommodating the ‘flexible (component) of the display screen markets’ but also of enhancing performance (lower cost, less heat, requiring less energy, higher quality image, as examples) … ergo … a better “User Experience”.  – GNT Team

Read the Article Here:

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/category/printed-electronics/

Nanosys Quantum Dot Concentrate (enables) a new generation of consumer devices with brighter, more colorful displays this fall.

“QDEF is enabling LCD makers to really challenge the newest OLED technology,” said Jason Hartlove, President and CEO of Nanosys. “We are working with display makers to create a new, perfect color display experience that is more cost effective, efficient and reliable than anything else currently on the market. This is fundamentally changing the economics of high performance displays back in favor of LCD technology, and demand for QDEF has grown to the point that we’ve significantly expanded our manufacturing to keep up.”

A drop-in optical component for LCDs, QDEF creates a richer, more lifelike color experience while consuming significantly less power. Based on a new generation of quantum dots from Nanosys, the 55-inch set on display in Korea achieves about 40% higher color gamut than commercially available white-LED based 4k televisions while reducing power consumption by more than 35%.

As always, we at ‘Team GNT’ welcome your comments and feedback. – GNT Team

 

LG Display Ready to Mass Produce Flexible OLED Panels for Smartphones

Flexible displays are all the rage these days for smartphones, with Samsung and LG battling to get theirs to market first and then onto devices. LG, as of late last night, is claiming that their flexible OLED is the first to be ready for mass production. In a press release, LG says that they already have a 6-inch flexible OLED that weighs just 7.2g and is only 0.44mm thick.

Typically when LG announces a new panel or technology that is made for smartphones or tablets, we tend to see an announcement of a product that uses the tech within a couple of weeks, sometimes days. With that said, LG did specifically mention that they expect flexible OLED displays to show up in automotive displays, and on tablets and wearable devices in the very near future. Their goal is to take an early lead in this market by introducing new products and enhanced performance and differentiated designs “next year.” That sounds to me like a flexible product isn’t coming until 2014.

 

LG Display Mass-Produce World’s First Flexible OLED Panel for Smartphones

LG Display brings innovation to the smartphone market with cutting-edge panel

Seoul, Korea (Oct. 7, 2013) – LG Display [NYSE: LPL, KRX: 034220], the world’s leading innovator of display technologies, today announced that it will start mass-production of the world’s first flexible OLED panel for smartphones. This state-of-the-art panel represents another milestone following the company’s commercial rollout of the world’s first 55-inch OLED TV display earlier this year.

“LG Display is launching a new era of flexible displays for smartphones with its industry-leading technology,” said Dr. Sang Deog Yeo, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of LG Display. “

The flexible display market is expected to grow quickly as this technology is expected to expand further into diverse applications including automotive displays, tablets and wearable devices. Our goal is to take an early lead in the flexible display market by introducing new products with enhanced performance and differentiated designs next year.”

LG Display’s flexible OLED panel is built on plastic substrates instead of glass. By applying film-type encapsulation technology and attaching the protection film to the back of the panel, LG Display made the panel bendable and unbreakable.

The new display is vertically concave from top to bottom with a radius of 700mm, opening up a world of design innovations in the smartphone market. And only 0.44mm thin, LG Display’s flexible OLED panel is the world’s slimmest among existing mobile device panels. What’s more, it is also the world’s lightest, weighing a mere 7.2g even with a 6-inch screen, the largest among current smartphone OLED displays.

In March 2012 LG Display developed the world’s first 6-inch Electronic Paper Display (EPD) based on e-ink which utilizes a plastic backplane. Having previously showcased the world’s first curved 55-inch OLED TV panel at CES 2013, today’s announcement highlights the company’s leading position in advanced flexible display technologies.

According to research firm IHS Display Bank, the global flexible display industry will see dramatic growth and become a USD 1.5 billion market by 2016, exceeding USD 10 billion by 2019. LG Display plans to advance flexible display technologies and bring innovation to consumers’ daily lives with the introduction of rollable and foldable displays in various sizes.

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 About LG Display

LG Display Co., Ltd. [NYSE: LPL, KRX: 034220] is a leading manufacturer and supplier of thin-film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panels, OLEDs and flexible displays. The company provides TFT-LCD panels in a wide range of sizes and specifications for use in TVs, monitors, notebook PCs, mobile products and other various applications. LG Display currently operates nine fabrication facilities and seven back-end assembly facilities in Korea, China, Poland, and Mexico. The company has a total of 56,000 employees operating worldwide. For more news and information about LG Display, please visit www.lgdnewsroom.com.