Reactor for Bulk Manufacturing of Core-Shell Quantum Dot Nanoparticles


Enables Large-Scale Production of Precision Quantum Dots for Medical Imaging, LEDs and Solar Cells

mix-id328072.jpgThis multi-variable reactor facilitates the manufacturing of high-precision, core-shell quantum dots – nanoparticles made from semiconductive materials that display unique optical and electrical properties. Quantum dots have applications in computing, photovoltaic devices (solar panels), light emitting diodes (LEDs) and medical imaging equipment.

 

By modifying or “tuning” the precise size and quality of quantum dots, scientists can control the wavelength (bandgap) of light emitted by LEDs, and can select the properties for various other applications, such as fluorescence-based diagnostics and cell staining in medical imaging. Quantum dots are currently manufactured using batch methods, which under hydrothermal conditions, are time-consuming and subject to batch-to-batch variation in the desired properties. Detailed tuning of quantum dots to precise optical properties can be difficult using existing technology. Researchers at the University of Florida have developed a hydrothermal reactor that offers high-precision tuning of quantum dots for bulk production. The reactor enhances reliability, precision, uniformity and throughput during large-scale quantum dot manufacturing, and could help capture a significant portion of the global quantum dots market, which is expected to reach $670 million by 2015.

 

To Read More Go To The Link Here:

http://technologylicensing.research.ufl.edu/technologies/14105/reactor-for-bulk-manufacturing-of-core-shell-quantum-dot-nanoparticles

 

Advertisements

Samsung licenses quantum dot LED IP from Evident Technologies: Where are They Now?


*** GNT Team Note: This announcement was significant now almost 2 and a-half years ago. But Team GNT wants to know .. “Where are they now?” 

 

201306047919620May 6, 2011 Evident Technologies Corporation and Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd entered into a comprehensive patent licensing and purchasing agreement for Evident’s quantum dot LED technology. This agreement grants Samsung worldwide access to Evident’s patent portfolio for all products related to quantum dot LEDs from manufacture of the quantum dot nanomaterials to final LED production.

“We are excited that Samsung, the leader in consumer electronics, has licensed our quantum dot technology,” said Dr. Clint Ballinger, CEO of Evident Technologies. “We already enjoy a terrific working relationship and look forward to the future of this technology.”

Quantum dots are nanometer-sized semiconductor crystals that have great commercial promise in electronic applications from solar energy conversion to thermoelectrics to LEDs. Evident commercialized quantum dot LEDs with products launched in 2007.

Evident Technologies is a nanotechnology company specializing in the creation of semiconductor quantum dots. Learn more at http://www.evidenttech.com/.

New process to make nanospheres could enable advances across multiple industries


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8(Nanowerk News) A patent-pending technology to produce  nanospheres developed by a research team at North Dakota State University,  Fargo, could enable advances across multiple industries, including electronics,  manufacturing, and biomedical sectors.

 

The environmentally-friendly process produces polymer-based  nanospheres (tiny microscopic particles) that are uniform in size and shape,  while being low-cost and easily reproducible. The process developed at NDSU  allows scale-up of operation to high production levels, without requiring  specialized manufacturing equipment.

NANOSPHERES
The environmentally-friendly process oxidizes ozone in water to produce  polymer-based nanospheres, ranging from 70 to 400 nanometers in diameter, that  are uniform in size and shape, stay suspended in solution, and are easily  removed using a centrifuge. The scanning electron microscopy image depicts the  uniform spherical morphology of these nanospheres.

A 3 a.m. Eureka! moment

Dr. Victoria Gelling, associate professor in the Department of  Coatings and Polymeric Materials at NDSU, had a “Eureka!” moment when she woke  early one morning – 3 a.m., to be precise, an hour when most of us are still  sleeping. Dr. Gelling used early morning creativity to imagine a new way to  oxidize monomers, which are relatively small and simple molecules, into  polymers, which are larger, more complex molecules that can be used to create  synthetic materials. Dr. Gelling hypothesized that oxidizing ozone in water  might accomplish this task.

Later that day in the lab, Dr. Gelling and her team tested the  hypothesis. On the first try, they created a suspension of nearly perfectly  rounded, uniformly-sized nanospheres, ranging from 70 to 400 nanometers in  diameter. In addition to their uniform size, the nanospheres stay suspended in  the solution, and are easily removed using a centrifuge.

“The synthesis of the nanospheres is rather simple, with no  other chemicals required other than water, ozone, and the small molecules which  will become the polymers,” said Dr. Gelling. “We also have tight control of the  size, as they are beautiful, perfect marbles.”

Given their uniform size and shape, the nanospheres could have  uses across multiple industries. According to Dr. Gelling, such nanospheres  could be used to:

  • Produce  high-performance electronic devices and energy-efficient digital displays
  • Create  materials with high conductivity and smaller parts for consumer electronics
  • Deliver  medicine directly to diseased cells in the body
  • Provide  antibacterial coating on dressing for wounds
  • Develop  nanosensors to aid in early disease detection
  • Create  coatings that provide increased protection against corrosion and  abrasion

Watch the Video Here: http://youtu.be/ndK-NzULfAk

Read more: http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=29729.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nanowerk%2FagWB+%28Nanowerk+Nanotechnology+News%29#ixzz2OgTkhlAa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=29729.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nanowerk%2FagWB+%28Nanowerk+Nanotechnology+News%29#ixzz2OgSpur00