Nanosys announces 2000kg quantum dot production milestone for high performance consumer displays


Sufficient material shipped to bring perfect color with high energy efficiency to millions of devices.

A shipment of Nanosys Quantum Dot Concentrate bound for a new generation of consumer devices with brighter, more colorful displays this fall. Nanosys just announced that it has reached 2,000 kg production milestone for quantum dots used high performance consumer displays.  (PRNewsFoto/Nanosys)
A shipment of Nanosys Quantum Dot Concentrate bound for a new generation of consumer devices with brighter, more colorful displays this fall. Nanosys just announced that it has reached 2,000 kg production milestone for quantum dots used high …

SEOUL, Korea, Sept. 30, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Nanosys, enabling a new generation of perfect-color fidelity, energy-efficient displays with its quantum-dot technology, today announced that it has passed a major production milestone at its recently opened 60,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Milpitas, CA. The shipment of more than 2000kg of Nanosys Quantum Dot Concentrate™, used to make Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF™), represents a significant step forward in the adoption of quantum dot technology for displays.

Nanosys is demonstrating a 55-inch 4K TV utilizing QDEF technology at the IHS E&M Quantum Dot Seminar in Seoul, Korea this week. A drop-in optical component for LCDs, QDEF creates a richer, more lifelike color experience while consuming significantly less power. Based on a new generation of quantum dots from Nanosys, the 55-inch set on display in Korea achieves about 40% higher color gamut than commercially available white-LED based 4k televisions while reducing power consumption by more than 35%.

“QDEF is enabling LCD makers to really challenge the newest OLED technology,” said Jason Hartlove, President and CEO of Nanosys. “We are working with display makers to create a new, perfect color display experience that is more cost effective, efficient and reliable than anything else currently on the market. This is fundamentally changing the economics of high performance displays back in favor of LCD technology, and demand for QDEF has grown to the point that we’ve significantly expanded our manufacturing to keep up.”

Nanosys is working closely with supply chain partners to continue ramping deliveries as demand for QDEF from global display manufacturers increases.

Media Contacts: Nanosys Jeff Yurek (408) 240-6745 jyurek@nanosysinc.com

About Nanosys, Inc. Nanosys, Inc. is an advanced material architect, harnessing the fundamental properties of inorganic materials into process ready systems that can integrate into existing manufacturing to produce vastly superior products in lighting, electronic displays and energy storage. For more information, visit www.nanosysinc.com.

SOURCE  Nanosys

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3M to Challenge OLED Displays with Quantum Dots


The giant industrial company says it will commercialize a quantum-dot optical film that dramatically improves LCD color.

 

OLED TVs: on sale soon
OLED TVs: on sale soon

3M’s optical systems business division is to collaborate with the venture-backed company Nanosys on a new quantum-dot technology that promises to help conventional liquid crystal displays (LCDs) hold off the challenge of organic LEDs (OLEDs).

OLED televisions will be launched this year by LG Display and, in all likelihood, Samsung, while other TV companies such as Panasonic and Sony are expected to follow suit. One of the big selling points of the technology is its more vibrant representation of colors, thanks to the fact that OLEDs are direct emitters of colored light – whereas LCDs are effectively filters of white light.

In an announcement timed to coincide with the Society for Information Display (SID) 2012 “Display Week” meeting – traditionally the event where new display technologies are first reported – Nanosys and 3M said that they intend to commercialize what is known as “quantum dot enhancement film” (QDEF) technology.

“QDEF is a drop-in film that LCD manufacturers can integrate with existing production processes,” say the two companies, meaning that the technology is directly compatible with existing LCD production – where 3M’s optical films already play a major role. “It utilizes the light-emitting properties of quantum dots to create an ideal backlight for LCDs.”

Rather than actively creating light, the quantum dot films developed by Nanosys effectively work like a phosphor. When exposed to blue emission provided by a phosphor-less gallium nitride LED backlight, the dots produce narrow-linewidth red and green light, which can be combined with the original blue emission to generate a high-quality white backlight.

Atomic behaviour Because they are so tiny, quantum dots behave in a similar manner to individual atoms, rather than bulk solids. And the precise color of the light that they produce when illuminated by blue LEDs is determined purely by their size. So by tightly controlling the size of the dots, they can be “tuned” to produce either red or green light at a precise and narrow range of wavelengths.

In an LCD display, what that translates to is a white backlight with a much wider color “gamut”, meaning a much more life-like representation of images on the screen is possible. “Current LCDs are limited to displaying 35 percent or less of the visible color spectrum,” the companies say. “This means the viewing experience on an LCD is vastly different than what a person sees in the real world.”

By increasing that color range by a claimed 50 percent, the QDEF technology offers a challenge to one of the key selling points associated with OLED displays – the vivid color reproduction that results from using direct light emitters in the pixels of the display.

Jason Hartlove, the CEO of Nanosys, said: “We are working together to improve an area of display performance that has been largely neglected for the last decade. Improving color performance for LCDs with drop-in solutions will bring a stunning new visual experience to the consumer and a competitive advantage to the LCD manufacturer against new display technologies such as OLED.”

SID “Gold” award for QDEF LED-backlit TVs and monitors are now commonplace, but one of the original commercial claims for using the technology was identical to that now being heralded by 3M and Nanosys – that it would improve color gamut dramatically, compared with the white fluorescent backlights that initially dominated in LCD TVs.

As things turned out, it was not color gamut but the ability to make TVs much slimmer and lighter that propelled LED backlights into the mainstream, largely thanks to the intervention of Samsung.

And as the world’s leading producer of active-matrix OLED screens – largely for its own mobile phone and tablet offerings – Samsung has a foot in both camps when it comes to improving color representation in the next generation of TV technologies.

Interestingly, the Korean company’s venture wing – Samsung Venture Investment Corporation – led Nanosys’ series E round of financing, which raised $31 million in late 2010.

The QDEF technology was also recognized at SID’s annual Display Industry Awards ceremony earlier this week, winning the SID Gold Award in the category of “display component of the year” at the Boston conference and show.

According to 3M, the quantum-dot film being commercialized by the two firms will simply replace a similar film already found inside LCD backlights, and for display manufacturers would require no new equipment or process changes.

3M to challenge OLED displays with quantum dots


OLED TVs: on sale soon
OLED TVs: on sale soon

QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 83M’s optical systems business division is to collaborate with the venture-backed company Nanosys on a new quantum-dot technology that promises to help conventional liquid crystal displays (LCDs) hold off the challenge of organic LEDs (OLEDs).

OLED televisions will be launched this year by LG Display and, in all likelihood, Samsung, while other TV companies such as Panasonic and Sony are expected to follow suit. One of the big selling points of the technology is its more vibrant representation of colors, thanks to the fact that OLEDs are direct emitters of colored light – whereas LCDs are effectively filters of white light.

In an announcement timed to coincide with the Society for Information Display (SID) 2012 “Display Week” meeting – traditionally the event where new display technologies are first reported – Nanosys and 3M said that they intend to commercialize what is known as “quantum dot enhancement film” (QDEF) technology.

“QDEF is a drop-in film that LCD manufacturers can integrate with existing production processes,” say the two companies, meaning that the technology is directly compatible with existing LCD production – where 3M’s optical films already play a major role. “It utilizes the light-emitting properties of quantum dots to create an ideal backlight for LCDs.”

Rather than actively creating light, the quantum dot films developed by Nanosys effectively work like a phosphor. When exposed to blue emission provided by a phosphor-less gallium nitride LED backlight, the dots produce narrow-linewidth red and green light, which can be combined with the original blue emission to generate a high-quality white backlight.

Atomic behaviour Because they are so tiny, quantum dots behave in a similar manner to individual atoms, rather than bulk solids. And the precise color of the light that they produce when illuminated by blue LEDs is determined purely by their size. So by tightly controlling the size of the dots, they can be “tuned” to produce either red or green light at a precise and narrow range of wavelengths.

In an LCD display, what that translates to is a white backlight with a much wider color “gamut”, meaning a much more life-like representation of images on the screen is possible. “Current LCDs are limited to displaying 35 percent or less of the visible color spectrum,” the companies say. “This means the viewing experience on an LCD is vastly different than what a person sees in the real world.”

By increasing that color range by a claimed 50 percent, the QDEF technology offers a challenge to one of the key selling points associated with OLED displays – the vivid color reproduction that results from using direct light emitters in the pixels of the display.

Jason Hartlove, the CEO of Nanosys, said: “We are working together to improve an area of display performance that has been largely neglected for the last decade. Improving color performance for LCDs with drop-in solutions will bring a stunning new visual experience to the consumer and a competitive advantage to the LCD manufacturer against new display technologies such as OLED.”

SID “Gold” award for QDEF LED-backlit TVs and monitors are now commonplace, but one of the original commercial claims for using the technology was identical to that now being heralded by 3M and Nanosys – that it would improve color gamut dramatically, compared with the white fluorescent backlights that initially dominated in LCD TVs.

As things turned out, it was not color gamut but the ability to make TVs much slimmer and lighter that propelled LED backlights into the mainstream, largely thanks to the intervention of Samsung.

And as the world’s leading producer of active-matrix OLED screens – largely for its own mobile phone and tablet offerings – Samsung has a foot in both camps when it comes to improving color representation in the next generation of TV technologies.

Interestingly, the Korean company’s venture wing – Samsung Venture Investment Corporation – led Nanosys’ series E round of financing, which raised $31 million in late 2010.

The QDEF technology was also recognized at SID’s annual Display Industry Awards ceremony earlier this week, winning the SID Gold Award in the category of “display component of the year” at the Boston conference and show.

According to 3M, the quantum-dot film being commercialized by the two firms will simply replace a similar film already found inside LCD backlights, and for display manufacturers would require no new equipment or process changes.

Nanosys Closes Sixth Funding Round: $15M New Investment to expand quantum dot manufacturing


nanosys Series F-01 Palo Alto, Calif., November 26, 2012 – Nanosys Inc., an advanced materials architect, today closed a $15 million sixth round of funding. The company will use the new investment to expand its quantum dot manufacturing capabilities. Nanosys’ flagship quantum dot product is Quantum Dot Enhancement Film™ (QDEF), which vastly improves the color performance and efficiency of Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs).

“You’ve never seen anything like a quantum dot display,” said Jason Hartlove, President and CEO of Nanosys. “We are working with display makers to create a new high color gamut display experience that is cheaper, more efficient and more reliable than anything else currently on the market. The response from manufacturers so far has been great and demand for QDEF has grown to the point that we’ll need to expand manufacturing to keep up.”

Nanosys will expand its quantum dot manufacturing line more than tenfold in order to meet increasing demand. The expansion will make Nanosys the largest quantum dot manufacturer in the world.

Most current LCDs are only capable of displaying 35 percent or less of the visible color spectrum. This means the viewing experience on an LCD is limited and vastly different from what is seen in the real world, as colors are altered or left out altogether. Wide color gamut displays make the viewing experience on an electronic device much closer to the vibrant visual experience of real life. An LCD powered by QDEF can display 50 percent or more color than a standard LCD. QDEF also provides a significant energy efficiency advantage over other LCD backlight technologies.

QDEF utilizes the light emitting properties of quantum dots to create an ideal backlight for LCDs, which is one of the most critical factors in the color and efficiency performance of the display. A quantum dot, which is 10,000 times narrower than a human hair, can be engineered to emit light at very precise wavelengths. QDEF relies on this unique ability to control the spectral output of a quantum dot to create an ideal white backlight specifically designed for LCDs. Trillions of custom engineered quantum dots are loaded into each sheet of QDEF, which fits inside an LCD backlight unit. The new film replaces one already found inside the LCD backlight, which means the manufacturing process requires no new equipment or process changes for the LCD manufacturer.

Nanosys Contact:
Daniel Klempay
(650) 762-2948
Dan.klempay@edelman.com

About Nanosys, Inc.
Nanosys, Inc. is an advanced material architect, harnessing the fundamental properties of inorganic materials into process ready systems that can integrate into existing manufacturing to produce vastly superior products in lighting, electronic displays and energy storage. For more information, visitwww.nanosysinc.com.

nanosys Series F-01