Graphene Batteries – What will it Take to Get Advanced Battery Materials ‘Out of the Lab’ and into Consumer Markets?


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Graphene Batteries are widely considered a “graphene’s killer app”. Killer apps drive commercial success and are critical for moving emerging technologies out of the lab and into large scale industrial applications.  Savvy nanotech innovators and early adopters have adopted a collective mindset of “talk is cheap, now prove it works”.
Are batteries Graphene’s killer app? Our Graphene Battery User’s Guide will detail traditional battery designs, emerging battery technologies, provide actionable steps that you can take to develop a graphene battery of your own, and detail what needs to happen to get advanced graphene batteries into consumer markets.
 

We ♥ Graphene Batteries

Humans love batteries – yes it sounds strange but batteries power our phones, tablets, laptops, cameras, fitbits, autos, toys, pacemakers, and clocks. Even the biggest companies with large market shares know they must be constantly advancing their battery’s performance. Consumers want longer lasting batteries with faster charging times and we don’t want to wait.graphene-supercapacitor

As Samuel Gibbs astutely points out “The iPhone 7 is a missed opportunity. Apart from a bit of fluff retention the fit and finish, the cameras, fingerprint scanner, snappy performance and waterproofing are all great. But what does it matter how good it is when the battery is dead?” Ouch! While I’m fairly sure that Steve Jobs is still resting comfortably, Samuel is spot on in his assessment.

 

 

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The Graphene Revolution Began With A Single Idea

Did Apple engineers simply take a pass when it came to designing the battery and matching it to the device’s needs? I doubt it considering the risk to brand loyalty when selling devices between $650-$850 USD.  A much loved company like Apple spends unfathomable sums of money designing & testing new products prior to launching them. Apple is aware that when they launch a new iphone, thousands of people line up to buy them as soon as they are released, much like when we used to sleep outside on the sidewalk while waiting for the ticket window to open for our favorite rock concerts.

So what gives? Apple likely made a survey of commercially viable battery technologies and realized that a graphene battery wasn’t ready for prime time for this generation iphone.  Being an early adopter only works to your benefit if it doesn’t create product nightmares. Imagine millions of phones with defective batteries. The cost alone would be staggering and the cost to brand loyalty devastating. Apple sure doesn’t want a Samsung like battery recall on its hands.

Graphene Battery Technology

lithium-reduced-graphene-oxide-battery

 

A battery is a source of electrical energy, which is provided by one or more electrochemical cells of the battery after conversion of stored chemical energy. In today’s life, batteries play an important part as many personal, household and industrial devices use batteries as their power source. In its most basic form, a battery is a cell consisting of an anode, a cathode, with an electrolytic material in between.

There are 6 basic types of batteries.

  • Alkaline Batteries -Alkaline batteries are non-rechargeable, high energy density, batteries that have a long life span. This battery obtained its name because the electrolyte used in it is alkaline (potassium hydroxide). The chemical composition features zinc powder as an anode and manganese dioxide as the cathode with potassium hydroxide as the electrolyte.
  • Nickel Cadmium (NiCd)- mature and well understood but relatively low in energy density. The NiCd is used where long life, high discharge rate and economical price are important. Main applications are two-way radios, biomedical equipment, professional video cameras and power tools. The NiCd contains toxic metals and is environmentally unfriendly.
  • Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) – has a higher energy density compared to the NiCd at the expense of reduced cycle life. NiMH contains no toxic metals. Applications include mobile phones and laptop computers.
  • Lead Acid — most economical for larger power applications where weight is of little concern. The lead acid battery is the preferred choice for hospital equipment, wheelchairs, emergency lighting and UPS systems.
  • Lithium Ion (Li‑ion) —  fastest growing battery system. Li‑ion is used where high-energy density and lightweight is of prime importance. The technology is fragile and a protection circuit is required to assure safety. Applications include notebook computers and cellular phones.
  • Lithium Ion Polymer (Li‑ion polymer) — offers the attributes of the Li-ion in ultra-slim geometry and simplified packaging. Main applications are mobile phones.

Why won’t Li Ion Batteries just die?

Li Ion batteries already have market acceptance. Companies have invested heavily production lines. Li Ion battery’s improve performance a respectable 6-8% per year. Earlier this year, an MIT start up announced they’ve doubled the life of a Li Ion battery. Competing graphene alternatives, while promising are still likely years away from commercial acceptance.

What’s the holdup?

As we’ve recently had Samsung’s great example of an epic product battery fail, no one wants to responsible for that within their own organization, to let down their customers, and to have negative brand loyalty.  Successful nano engineering takes repeated trials to make small steps in the right direction.

It’s not as easy as “throw some graphene in it and sell it”. For an in depth review, check out our Graphene Battery User’s Guide to come up to date on research trends as well as to learn actionable steps that you can take to develop your own graphene battery with the four designs of experiments included in the guide.

References

http://www.brighthubengineering.com/power-generation-distribution/123909-types-of-batteries-and-their-applications/

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/sep/23/iphone-7-review-poor-battery-life

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-18/samsung-crisis-began-in-rush-to-capitalize-on-uninspiring-iphone

http://news.mit.edu/2016/lithium-metal-batteries-double-power-consumer-electronics-0817

 

University of Alberta Joins Materials Research Society (MRS)


Nanotubes imagesMaterials science and nanotechnology students at the University of Alberta have recently joined more than 70 universities across the world in becoming members of the internationally known Materials Research Society (MRS).

The newly established MRS chapter at the U of A is the first in Canada and will set an example for other universities in the country to follow, according to its founding member.

Rokib Hassan, PhD student and president of the U of A MRS chapter, said it’s becoming increasingly important for students to get involved with these global organizations, as they help foster a sense of leadership in their fields.

“What happens is the (students can) boost their research and commit to working with the materials research or nanotechnology communities,” he said.

“They’re trying to create a field or a platform for their students, so that they can become more passionate to pursue their interests or their research in the areas of materials research or nanotechnology.”

The idea to establish a chapter at the U of A came to Hassan when he travelled to Cancun for an MRS conference and saw the types of schools that were represented — some of the largest, most prestigious American universities had established chapters, he said, but no Canadian schools.

“I was quite shocked when I went there,” Hassan said. “I started thinking, ‘Why not from Canada?’ We are just beside the U.S., and if the U.S. are leading all the (research), why not Canada?”

Hassan said when he began the process of founding the U of A chapter, he received positive responses from the community, quickly gathering interested undergraduate students, graduate students and faculty members in a matter of weeks.

Going forward, the new chapter aims to host its own symposium next year, and eventually create undergraduate funding and a summer research program. Hassan said the chapter, like the ever-changing fields of nanotechnology and materials science, is looking to build the future.

“In the future, everything is coming up to the materials science and nanotechnology, if you think about making all the devices for your iPhone or smartphone,” he said.“Everything is coming into the materials science and nanotechnology (area).”

Mercedes Is Testing Google Glass Integration, and It Actually Works


imagesCAMR5BLR Einstein Judging a FishI put the car in park, unplug the phone, and put Google Glass on my face. Within seconds, I’ve got step-by-step directions to a coffee shop down the street beamed directly to my eyeballs. This is what Mercedes-Benz has planned for the future, and not only do they have a functioning prototype, they’re working with Google to make it a reality.

 

 

 

It’s called “Door-to-Door Navigation,” and it’s just the latest in a string of high-tech pushes the automaker has made in the past few years. It started with Mercedes doubling its resources and employees at its Silicon Valley research center, which allowed the automaker to work on a thoroughly revised infotainment platform and develop one of the first comprehensive integrations of Apple’s iPhone into its entry level and youth-focused CLA.

Now, it’s Google’s turn.

“We definitely see wearable devices as another trend in the industry that is important to us,” says Johann Jungwirth, Mercedes’ North American R&D President & CEO. “We have been working with Glass for roughly six months and meeting with the Google Glass team regularly.” And it’s helpful that Google HQ is just a 10-minute drive from the automaker’s Palo Alto research facility.

We’ve already established that cars are the killer app for Google Glass. And Mercedes agrees. The German automaker’s R&D center snagged two pairs of Google’s goggles as soon as they became available — recognizing the potential — and started hacking away.

The first application is a navigation program that allows you to enter an address through Google Glass, get in your car, plug in your phone, and then the destination is transferred to the in-dash navigation system. Once you’ve arrived near the restaurant/bar/nightclub/BBQ joint and unplug your phone, the system re-transfers the data back to Glass to complete the journey. And based on hands-on time, it works. But the way it works is … a little rough.

Google doesn’t offer Glass support for the iPhone. Yet. And the Mercedes “Digital DriveStyle App” doesn’t work with Android. Yet. (Jungwirth tells WIRED that iOS is the dominant platform for Mercedes owners). So in order for the destination information to be sent from the car to Glass, Mercedes connects to its own cloud server between the iPhone and the embedded infotainment system. Google Glass handles the communication between the two, and the trigger to communicate is the disconnection of the iPhone from the car. When that happens, it contacts the server, connects to Glass, and downloads the destination information.

Jungwirth is quick to point out that this elaborate dance of connections is just a proof of concept.

“This is, perhaps, not how we will accomplish it when we launch it as a product,” Jungwirth told WIRED. “As we are in talks with Google about making a direct connection to Glass work, but it is how our prototype works today.”

Jungwirth makes it clear that Mercedes has every intention of integrating some form of Google Glass functionality into its future products. And by the time Glass goes into production in the next year, Mercedes may have something to offer its customers. In the meantime, Jungwirth says that Android integration for Mercedes vehicles is coming in 2014.

Are Legal Battles Ahead for Samsung & LG and Will That Give the Edge to Apple in OLED’s?


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Apple Flexible OLED

The reports from the industry already have suggested that Apple with indeed be the first to commercially release a product featuring flexible OLED displays, and although they are certainly not without their own legal disputes with various electronics manufacturers, could this be their window of opportunity to get in first?

Before assuming these reports are accurate – there are suggestions that reports aren’t entirely telling the whole truth about this “raid”.

A spokeswoman from Samsung, Jun Eun Sun is quoted as saying “We have no reason to steal other companies’ technology, as we have the world’s best OLED technology.” LG itself has said that it didn’t report anything to police in connection with the investigation with their spokesman, Son Young Jun saying “The latest investigation is related to large-sized OLED TV panel technology, but the police have made the allegation themselves.”

Of course legal battles alone most certainly do not halt the research, development & production of such technology, and has indeed been the cause of disputes between the companies historically, but it may just be enough to allow Apple the edge. Recently they posted a job advert for a “Display Specialist to lead the investigation on emerging display technologies such as high optical efficiency LCD, AMOLED and flexible display to improve overall display optical performance.”

Flexible being the operative word here, and coupled with their patent for a new shaped iPhone with a “wraparound” display, suggest they are not just on the heels of the two South Korean giants, but firmly in the same race. Indeed they have been for some time – the public release of the Apple patent belies its date of inception – September 2011, way before Samsung’s Brian Berkeley demonstrated and announced their new flexible display. For the record, Apple pulled the job advert fairly quickly, but not before it was noticed by the tech media.

Let’s not also forget that LG are going full-steam ahead to be first to market, with plans to release their first AMOLED flexible display device in the second half of 2013. With all this cloak-and-dagger reports it really would take a company insider to tell the world the reality of what’s going on behind the scenes in the world of flexible OLED tech, and oledflexible.net never like to jump the gun on announcements, but the volume of reports coming out of Asia on a daily basis can only mean that something reasonably big will be announced soon. The burning question is – which company will be the one to make the announcement first, and which product will have the most appeal to the public?

10 Mistakes to Avoid When Pitching Investors (Infographic)


QDOTS imagesCAKXSY1K 8Like it or not, money is the lifeblood of a business. If you are on the hunt  for capital and have landed a meeting with an investor, your first impression  can either be a deal breaker or money in the bank.

 

 

According to Founder Institute,  an early-stage startup accelerator in Mountain View, Calif., one of the biggest  flubs rookies make in an investor presentation pitch is failing to include  charts and graphs. If you aren’t sure how to go about making charts and graphs  that relate to your financial projections, you can consider hiring a business  student or a certified public accountant for a day to help. Also, the institute  says, steer clear of promising potential investors that your startup is going to  be worth $1 billion by its fifth year. Investors want conservative estimates  that they can trust, not pie-in-the-sky guesstimates.

Other tips from the Founder Institute include:

  • Avoid a “hard coded” financial spreadsheet in your presentation – that is,  don’t make your numbers unchangeable in a spreadsheet. Present your information  so that investors can play with your various financial inputs to see how your  business model will survive in changing conditions.
  • Skip what’s known as a “top down” financial forecast where you assume that  your company will automatically win a percentage of some existing market.  Instead, use what’s called “bottom up” forecasting, where you base your  financial projections on an actual budget: essentially, how many items you are  going to sell multiplied by how much each is worth.
  • Talk about the size of your total addressable market (TAM), but don’t focus  on it. For example, if you are creating an iPhone game for women ages 35 and up,  the size of the entire gaming industry would be your total addressable market  and would be largely irrelevant. Instead, research your serviceable addressable  market (SAM), which in this example would be the total market for women over the  age of 35.

In the infographic below, Founder Institute offers a list of the 10 rookie  pitching mistakes it sees on a regular basis.

Top Ten ‘Rookie Mistakes’

1. Not using Charts, Graphs or Tabs in pitch materials.

2. Hard Coding numbers into your spreadsheet.

3. Not using “Bottom Up” Analysis

4. Not Connecting the Financial model to the Narrative

5. Not knowing your “Total Adressable Market” (TAM) and your “Serviceable Adressable Market” (SAM)

6. Not using Generally Accepted Accounting Rules.

7. Not doing a Cash Flow Analysis

8. Underestimating your Variable Expenses

9. Not knowing your Comparable Market Metrics

10. Projecting $1 Billion in Revenues Year 5.

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What is your best piece of advice for new entrepreneurs heading  to a first pitch session with an investor? Leave a note below and let  us know.

Related: Entrepreneurship: Risks You Need to Consider  (Infographic)

Samsung displays devices with screens that bend and fold


Galaxy SkinSamsung Galaxy Skin was displayed with a flexible screen

Samsung is pushing the envelope in new areas of smartphone design, as it displayed devices with screens that bend. Samsung Galaxy Skin is reported to feature a flexible AMOLED, which uses a plastic polymer instead of glass. The new range of Samsung’s flexible phones will come in handy for clumsy hands as the device is reported to survive falls and blows.

The devices with flexible screens from Samsung are reported to be in the last phase of development and are rumoured to be released in the first half of next year. The flexibility of the screen is a result of the use of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), which are thin and can be applied on flexible material, like plastic or metal foil.

Samsung is not the only company which has tried to create something unique like the flexible screens as companies like Japan’s Sony and South Korea’s LG Display have launched prototypes of the flexible screens. Samsung had previously promised flexible displays this year, but the date has passed with no confirmation from the South Korean manufacturer.

 

The prototypes of the flexible devices were displayed at the 2012 Plastics show in Birmingham this week. With the flexible devices, Samsung might be looking to create a unique pedestal for the South Korean company and the bendy devices might prove to be the factor, which pushes Samsung ahead.

Lee Chang-hoon, Vice President of Samsung’s display division, told the Journal that the South Korean company has sent out samples of the new displays to a few select customers.

Related:
Samsung Galaxy S4 rumours predict launch in January 2013
Galaxy S3 ousts iPhone 4S, becomes world’s best-selling smartphone in Q3 2012
Samsung Galaxy S3 64GB variant now available for pre-order in UK at £600

Galaxy Skin

Green Energy Wall Street Wonder in The Making! QTMM


Posted by  on Jan 28th, 2012 and filed under FeaturedTech. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

The beauty of this quantum dot is its ubiquitous use in so many life changing applications.

It’s all about a company that can make copious amounts of quantum dots for nanotechnology that the average person doesn’t understand, doesn’t know if you can see it with the naked eye, hasn’t a clue how it is used, what it is used for or what it even is.

I first read in Motley Fool a statement and loved it because it is so true, So, I’ll relay it again “the secret to making a fortune in the stock market is to identify a unique growth business poised to dominate a mass market.” You’ll want to remember that and invest for the future in nanotechnology. One company that meets the criteria as a growth business that will dominate a mass market is Quantum Materials Corp with their Tetrapod Quantum Dot’s (TQD).  They have multiple uses in a wide array of applications in many different sectors…not just solar, medical and visual displays.

Those were the primary reasons that I invested in this stock in the 1st place and as more and more uses for quantum dots are discovered every day,  it re-enforces that I made the right decision….”it’s the same as having ‘a diversified portfolio , all in one stock’.”[1]  An investment in this nanotechnology company that most people know nothing about is going to change how the world develops in ways completely unimaginative to most.

Tissue welding with lasers during surgery, selective cell isolation to eradicate cancers, Solar cells with up to 65% efficiency, displays that pop with vibrant colors, power consumption 50% less than existing means, 3D TV’s that could go into the realm of holographic realism, clothing and paints that change color with the whim of your desires.

Sounds far fetched?
So was Dick Tracy’s 2 way wrist radio/TV watch in 1964, precursor to cell phones today. The Quantum Materials Corporation developed the method to mass produce a nanocrystal called a QUANTUM DOT that will follow the world-changing technologies like Plastics 1920′s – 40′s, Biotech 1940′s – 60-s, Internet 1970′s – 90′s and now Nanotech.

The last press release with NanoAxis using Quantum Materials Corp TQD’s in their Cancer, Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and depression research was eye opening. http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/9/prweb8794822.htm

Multiple applications like that in one sector of one market give credence to the depth of this technology into the diverse commercial markets opening up. Opto-electronics and the display screens that save energy proposed in the new QDLED for the iPhone 5 [2]  to the household light bulbs will all use Quantum Dots. Anything that has color associated with it is a candidate for QD use.

How broad is that? And the amazing part of this is it goes both ways. Not only do quantum dots give off vibrant light in every visible color spectrum but they absorb light in every spectrum to generate electricity.

Solar cells will power devices 24/7. This day and night production of electricity uses solar cells that generate power from the ultraviolet thru visible to the infrared lighting range to produce their power. To be more descriptive, sunlight at zenith (climax or high point) provides an irradiance of just over 1 kilowatt per square meter at sea level. Of this energy 527 watts is infrared radiation, 445 watts is visible light, and 32 watts is ultraviolet radiation. The wafer type solar cells available today can only process visible light. That leaves out over half of the energy available from IR and the remainder in the UV56% of the available energy to be converted to electricity is LOST using today’s solar cells.

Tomorrow using the Solterra Renewable Technology flexible solar cell you will be able to capture that lost energy in the IR and UV region. And what is really exciting about this new Nanotechnology with Tetrapod Quantum Dots is it’s absorption capability 24 hours a day! Like enhanced night vision goggles the IR at night (although it would be a small amount) is enough to continue generation of power around the clock.

You can’t say now that you didn’t have a chance to look into what could be the next Wall Street Wonder company with return potentials like Dell, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon had.

Investigate Quantum Materials Corp – ticker QTMM and follow the company developments, just don’t watch another life time opportunity pass you by. Life is too short waiting for the next one to come by.