Four Emerging Technology Areas That Will Help Define Our World In 2019


Welcome to 2019....

2018 was surely a transformative year for technological innovation. We saw early development of ambient computing, quantum teleportation, cloaks of invisibility, genomics advancements and even robocops.

Granted we’re not flying around in our own cars like the Jetsons did yet, but we’re closer. In 2019 we will continue on the transformation path and expand even more into adopting cutting edge immersive technologies.

What’s ahead for the coming year? I envision four emerging technology areas that will significantly impact our lives in 2019.

1.  The Internet of Things and Smart Cities

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the general idea of devices and equipment that are readable, recognizable, locatable, addressable, and/or controllable via the internet. 

This includes everything from home appliances, wearable technology and cars. These days, if a device can be turned on, it most likely can be connected to the internet. Because of this, data can be shared quickly across a multitude of objects and devices increasing the rate of communications.

Cisco, who terms the “Internet of Things,” “The Internet of Everything,” predicts that 50 billion devices (including our smartphones, appliances and office equipment) will be wirelessly connected via a network of sensors to the internet by 2020.

The term “Smart City” connotes creating a public/private infrastructure to conduct activities that protect and secure citizens. The concept of Smart Cities integrates communications (5-G), transportation, energy, water resources, waste collections, smart-building technologies, and security technologies and services. They are the cities of the future.

IoT is the cog of Smart Cities that integrates these resources, technologies, services and infrastructure.

The research firm Frost & Sullivan estimates the combined global market potential of Smart City segments (transportation, healthcare, building, infrastructure, energy and governance) to be $1.5 Trillion ($20B by 2050 on sensors alone according to Navigant Technology).

The combined growth of IoT and Smart Cities will be a force to reckon with in 2019!

     2.  Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Emergent artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, human-computer interface, and augmented reality technologies are no longer science fiction. Head-spinning technological advances allow us to gain greater data-driven insights than ever before.

The ethical debate about AI is fervent over the threatening implications of future technologies that can think like a human (or better) and make their own decisions. The creation of a “Hal” type entity as depicted in Stanley Kubrick’s film, 2001 A Space Odyssey, is not far-fetched.

To truly leverage our ability to use data driven insights we need to make sure our thinking about how to best use this data keeps pace with its availability.

The vast majority of digital data is unstructured: a complex mesh of images, texts, videos and other data formats. Estimates suggest 80-90 percent of the world’s data is unstructured and growing at an increasingly rapid rate each day.

To even begin to make sense of this much data, advanced technologies are required. Artificial intelligence is the means by which this data is processed today, and it’s already a part of your everyday life.

In 2019, companies and governments will continue to develop technology that distributes artificial intelligence and machine learning software to millions of graphics and computer processors around the world. The question is how far away are we from a “Hal” with the ability for human analysis and techno emotions? 

     3.  Quantum Computing

The world of computing has witnessed seismic advancements since the invention of the electronic calculator in the 1960s. The past few years in information processing have been especially transformational.

What were once thought of as science fiction fantasies are now technological realities. Classical computing has become more exponentially faster and more capable and our enabling devices smaller and more adaptable.

We are starting to evolve beyond classical computing into a new data era called quantum computing. It is envisioned that quantum computing will accelerate us into the future by impacting the landscape of artificial intelligence and data analytics.

The quantum computing power and speed will help us solve some of the biggest and most complex challenges we face as humans.

Gartner describes quantum computing as: “[T]he use of atomic quantum states to effect computation. Data is held in qubits (quantum bits), which have the ability to hold all possible states simultaneously. Data held in qubits is affected by data held in other qubits, even when physically separated.

This effect is known as entanglement.” In a simplified description, quantum computers use quantum bits or qubits instead of using binary traditional bits of ones and zeros for digital communications.

Futurist Ray Kurzweil said that mankind will be able to “expand the scope of our intelligence a billion-fold” and that “the power of computing doubles, on average, every two years.” Recent breakthroughs in physics, nanotechnology and materials science have brought us into a computing reality that we could not have imagined a decade ago.

As we get closer to a fully operational quantum computer, a new world of supercomputing beckons that will impact on almost every aspect of our lives. In 2019 we are inching closer.

     4.  Cybersecurity (and Risk Management)

Many corporations, organizations and agencies have continued to be breached throughout 2018 despite cybersecurity investments on information assurance. The cyber threats grow more sophisticated and deadly with each passing year. The firm Gemalto estimated that data breaches compromised 4.5 billion records in first half of 2018. And a University of Maryland study found that hackers now attack computers every 39 seconds.

In 2019 we will be facing a new and more sophisticated array of physical security and cybersecurity challenges (including automated hacker tools) that pose significant risk to people, places and commercial networks.

The nefarious global threat actors are terrorists, criminals, hackers, organized crime, malicious individuals, and in some cases, adversarial nation states.

The physical has merged with the digital in the cybersecurity ecosystem. The more digitally interconnected we become in our work and personal lives, the more vulnerable we will become. Now everyone and anything connected is a target.

Cybersecurity is the digital glue that keeps IoT, Smart Cities, and our world of converged machines, sensors, applications and algorithms operational.

Addressing the 2019 cyber-threat also requires incorporating a better and more calculated risk awareness and management security strategy by both the public and private sectors. A 2019 cybersecurity risk management strategy will need to be comprehensive, adaptive and elevated to the C-Suite. 

I have just touched on a few of the implications of four emerging technology areas that will have significant impact in our lives in 2019.

These areas are just the tip of the iceberg as we really are in the midst of a paradigm shift in applied scientific knowledge.  We have entered a new renaissance of accelerated technological development that is exponentially transforming our civilization.

Yet with these benefits come risks. With such catalyzing innovation, we cannot afford to lose control. The real imperative for this new year is for planning and systematic integration.  

Hopefully that will provide us with a guiding technological framework that will keep us prosperous and safe.

Article by Chuck Brooks Special to Forbes Magazine
Chuck Brooks is an Advisor and Contributor to Cognitive World. In his full time role he is the Principal Market Growth Strategist for General Dynamics Mission Systems…MORE
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7 Emerging Technologies that are Changing Mission Critical Processes: IoT .. AI .. AR and


An article by Jorge Sagastume, Vice President at EscrowTech International, Inc.

Sometimes, even the simplest of processes can be critical to the continued day-to-day operation of your business. That’s why businesses should be taking a proactive approach to enhancing their processes by making use of the latest technologies available that could facilitate business process management.

Here are 7 technologies — including Blockchain technology and the Internet of Things — that are already demonstrating how they have the potential to completely overhaul existing critical processes:

 

1. Blockchain

Your data is important. In fact, it’s crucial to your vital business processes. Your data can tell you what you need to do, how you need to do it, and when it needs to be done. So what happens if that data is inaccurate, or is tampered with through either internal or external sources? Process failure. That’s where Blockchain technology comes in. The ‘Blockchain’ is a database or ledger that records transactions, activity, or behaviors automatically without the need for human input. It cannot be altered, changed, or amended manually, significantly boosting the accuracy, security, and efficiency of your critical processes. Most commonly associated with cryptocurrency, Blockchain can be used in practically any industry.

2. Internet of Things

Mission critical processes are essential for the continued smooth running of a business, but an ongoing concern with these vital processes is that they can be challenging to analyze and review to ensure they’re the most efficient, effective, and productive processes that the business could be using. That’s why many businesses are looking into the Internet of Things, or IoT. IoT is the concept of interconnected devices; one talks to another, to another, and so on as necessary. These devices can also be set up to operate on an ‘if x, then x’ schedule. In terms of mission-critical processes, connected devices can be used to gather data from multiple areas to comprehensively monitor and record how you work.

3. Business Process Automation Software

Business Process Automation software, or BPA software, works to simplify your mission-critical processes, minimize the need for human input (thereby reducing the risk of human error), and streamline the way you work. However, it is important to understand that forming a heavy reliance on automation software isn’t an entirely risk-free endeavor, particularly if you use the cloud-based software. While there are advantages of the cloud, there are also concerns. If your business relies on third-party software for mission-critical processes, consider a software escrow agreement, where the source code for the BPA software is held by a neutral agency and released to you should your provider go bankrupt.

4. Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence, or AI, is a key catalyst facilitating the new ‘digital transformation’; a shift from rigid business processes to more flexible approaches using the intelligent software. AI and machine-learning technologies become smarter with continued use, as they ‘learn’ more about operations. This can able your technology to identify process flow patterns, apply fixes to enhance the process, locate patterns and trends in your way of working and highlight any room for improvement. The technology can predict how your business processes will fare in the future by merging with existing business process management platforms ultimately improving continuity, lowering costs, and boosting efficiency.

5. Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has been around for a while, but it is only recently that it has become ready to support mission-critical processes and applications. Part of this readiness stems from the longevity and continued strength of cloud providers, and the ability of providers to demonstrate experience in IT management. By moving mission-critical processes to the cloud, businesses find that they have greater flexibility, enabling them to focus more on their own core competencies which, in many cases, is not IT-based. Cloud providers today are able to show solid track records in terms of security and reliability, perhaps more so than businesses themselves are able to demonstrate, meaning mission-critical applications are safe.

6. Edge Computing

Although cloud computing and edge computing are often said to be polar opposites, both technologies have the potential to completely overhaul existing mission-critical processes. While cloud computing is concerned with a central ‘hub’, edge computing is more focused on the availability of several shared-effort facilities, often located closer to the user (or on the ‘edge’). In terms of mission-critical processes, the advantage for businesses is notable low latency which can boost the speed of your processes and facilitate real-time functionality to improve accuracy and efficiency. However, not all providers are able to offer edge computing yet, and it is still considered to be an emerging technology.

7. Augmented Reality

Augmented reality already has a firm place in commerce; it’s used to try on clothes without buying, check that furniture fits in the home, or see a new car on the driveway without signing the contract. However, augmented reality, or AR, is still relatively new in terms of internal mission-critical processes, but it certainly seems to have a place. Google Glass was one of the first examples of how AR could be used in the enterprise, and how it could impact business processes. It can enable users to overlay their environment with vital information to ensure accurate troubleshooting, faster fix times, optimal productivity, better learning, and enhanced safety, all using a completely hands-free method.

About the author:
Jorge Sagastume is a Vice President at EscrowTech International, Inc. with 12 years of experience protecting IP and earning the trust of the greatest companies in the world. Jorge has been invited to speak on IP issues by foreign governments and international agencies.

MIT: The Internet of Things ~ A RoadMap to a Connected World And  … The Super-Capacitors and Batteries Needed to Power ‘The Internet of Things”


The Internet of Things: Roadmap to a Connected World ~ The Sensors ~ The Super Capacitors and Batteries Needed to Power the IoT

Provided by: MIT PE: Dr. S. Sarma

The rapidly increasing number of interconnected devices and systems today brings both benefits and concerns. In this column and a new MIT Professional Education class, the head of MIT’s open and digital learning efforts discusses how to successfully navigate the IoT.

What if every vehicle, home appliance, heating system and light switch were connected to the Internet? Today, that’s not such a stretch of the imagination.

Modern cars, for instance, already have hundreds of sensors and multiple computers connected over an internal network. And that’s just one example of the 6.4 billion connected “things” in use worldwide this year, according to research by Gartner Inc. DHL and Cisco Systems offer even higher estimates—their 2015 Trend Report sets the current number of connected devices at about 15 billion, amidst industry expectations that the tally will increase to 50 billion by 2020.

The Internet of Things (IoT)—a sophisticated network of objects embedded with electronic systems that enable them to collect and exchange data—is disrupting technology and changing the way we live. 

Fewer than two decades ago, if I’d predicted that the IoT would transform the auto-rental industry, people would have laughed. Yet here we are now in the age of Zipcar. By pioneering a range of connected technologies, the car-sharing company has unlocked greater convenience for customers and kick-started the sharing economy. Now the functionality of IoT-enabled cars is transforming the auto industry—from the ultra-connected Tesla to Google’s self-driving cars—and Uber hopes one day to chauffeur you to your destination in an autonomous vehicle.

The IoT is ultimately bound to affect almost every aspect of daily life. In fact, I encourage you to try to figure out where the IoT will not be. But how “smart” is it to let the IoT pervade everything in our lives, without active and purposeful design?

Read About: How Smart-Nano Materials will Change the World Around Us

Watch a Video Presentation About a New Energy Company Making the Super-Capacitors and Batteries that will Power the IoT

 

The IoT: Then and Now

About 18 years ago, as a mechanical engineering professor at MIT, I worked with my colleagues to launch the research effort that laid some of the groundwork for the IoT.

In those early days, our goals were to help implement the radio-frequency identification (RFID) systems that would become integral to connected devices, and to work on developing a standard for data from those devices. At that time, we were excited by the potential for a world of networked things.

Since then, the IoT has expanded into many corners of society and industry, but I’ve become increasingly concerned about its security implications.

How ‘smart’ is it to let the Internet of Things pervade everything in our lives, without active and purposeful design?

I will address such concerns in my new MIT Professional Education online course, Internet of Things: Roadmap to a Connected World.

While we’ll focus on the future of IoT and its business potential, we’ll also tackle its significant challenges, which range from security, privacy, and authenticity issues to the desirable features of a distributed architecture for a network of things.

The IoT’s underlying challenge is that there are no clear and agreed-upon architectures for building connected systems. Your light switch may have one level of data-security encryption, while your TV remote control has another.
Wireless protocols may differ, too: One device might use ZigBee while others rely on Bluetooth or Wi-Fi. Bridges to connect across all these options will proliferate. And even if independent systems are secure, we will have to cobble them together—and the resulting chain will only be as strong as the weakest link.

Controlling the Chaos


By creating new procedures, standards, and best practices, we can bring order to the disorder the IoT generates. As the IoT grows, we should focus on three primary issues:

1. Agreement on system architecture. Today, the IoT is an abstract collection of uses and products. It’s imperative that we establish paradigms for effective implementation and use.

2. Development of open standards reflecting the best architectural choices. Standards for communication between connected things do exist. But there are simply too many standards, each serving a different purpose. The result: a series of silos. For instance, think about how the blood oxygen sensor on a patient’s finger can be affected by what’s happening with the blood pressure monitor on his or her arm. Neither device is necessarily designed to share data.

Open standards, rather than a series of private ones, are necessary to facilitate genuine inter-connectedness. But the deeper question is how and why we need to make these connections, as well as how to extract value from them. This is where cloud computing comes in. Perhaps instead of having the sensors talk to each other directly, they need to talk in the cloud. (I’ll discuss this more in our online course.)

3. Creation of a “test bed” where best practices can be designed and perfected. While the first two needs are best handled by industry, the test bed platform is best created by the government. Remember that the current Internet would not have existed without the early leadership of the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency (now called the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA.) Today, the government could create a similar agency to incubate academic institutions, labs, and companies testing and working on best practices for the IoT.

A ‘Smarter’ Future  
No question about it: The IoT will influence everything from robots and retail to buildings and banking. To leverage the power of the IoT responsibly and profitably, you need to develop and implement your own IoT technologies, solutions, and applications.

Dr. Sanjay Sarma: MIT Professional Education Course: Internet of Things: Roadmap to a Connected World. This six-week course is designed to help you better understand the IoT—and, ultimately, harness its power.