MIT’s 10 Breakthrough Technologies for 2019 – Introduction by Bill Gates: Part I


In this Two (2) Part Re-Post from MIT Technology Review 10 Breakthrough Technologies for 2019. Guest Curator Bill Gates has been asked to choose this year’s list of inventions that will change the world for the better.

Part I: Bill Gates: How we’ll Invent the Future

was honored when MIT Technology Review invited me to be the first guest curator of its 10 Breakthrough Technologies. Narrowing down the list was difficult. I wanted to choose things that not only will create headlines in 2019 but captured this moment in technological history—which got me thinking about how innovation has evolved over time.

My mind went to—of all things—the plow. Plows are an excellent embodiment of the history of innovation. Humans have been using them since 4000 BCE, when Mesopotamian farmers aerated soil with sharpened sticks. We’ve been slowly tinkering with and improving them ever since, and today’s plows are technological marvels.

 

But what exactly is the purpose of a plow? It’s a tool that creates more: more seeds planted, more crops harvested, more food to go around. In places where nutrition is hard to come by, it’s no exaggeration to say that a plow gives people more years of life. The plow—like many technologies, both ancient and modern—is about creating more of something and doing it more efficiently, so that more people can benefit.

Contrast that with lab-grown meat, one of the innovations I picked for this year’s 10 Breakthrough Technologies list. Growing animal protein in a lab isn’t about feeding more people. There’s enough livestock to feed the world already, even as demand for meat goes up. Next-generation protein isn’t about creating more—it’s about making meat better. It lets us provide for a growing and wealthier world without contributing to deforestation or emitting methane. It also allows us to enjoy hamburgers without killing any animals.

Put another way, the plow improves our quantity of life, and lab-grown meat improves our quality of life. For most of human history, we’ve put most of our innovative capacity into the former. And our efforts have paid off: worldwide life expectancy rose from 34 years in 1913 to 60 in 1973 and has reached 71 today.

Because we’re living longer, our focus is starting to shift toward well-being. This transformation is happening slowly. If you divide scientific breakthroughs into these two categories—things that improve quantity of life and things that improve quality of life—the 2009 list looks not so different from this year’s. Like most forms of progress, the change is so gradual that it’s hard to perceive. It’s a matter of decades, not years—and I believe we’re only at the midpoint of the transition.

To be clear, I don’t think humanity will stop trying to extend life spans anytime soon. We’re still far from a world where everyone everywhere lives to old age in perfect health, and it’s going to take a lot of innovation to get us there. Plus, “quantity of life” and “quality of life” are not mutually exclusive. A malaria vaccine would both save lives and make life better for children who might otherwise have been left with developmental delays from the disease.

We’ve reached a point where we’re tackling both ideas at once, and that’s what makes this moment in history so interesting. If I had to predict what this list will look like a few years from now, I’d bet technologies that alleviate chronic disease will be a big theme. This won’t just include new drugs (although I would love to see new treatments for diseases like Alzheimer’s on the list). The innovations might look like a mechanical glove that helps a person with arthritis maintain flexibility, or an app that connects people experiencing major depressive episodes with the help they need.

If we could look even further out—let’s say the list 20 years from now—I would hope to see technologies that center almost entirely on well-being. I think the brilliant minds of the future will focus on more metaphysical questions: How do we make people happier? How do we create meaningful connections? How do we help everyone live a fulfilling life?

I would love to see these questions shape the 2039 list, because it would mean that we’ve successfully fought back disease (and dealt with climate change). I can’t imagine a greater sign of progress than that. For now, though, the innovations driving change are a mix of things that extend life and things that make it better. My picks reflect both. Each one gives me a different reason to be optimistic for the future, and I hope they inspire you, too.

My selections include amazing new tools that will one day save lives, from simple blood tests that predict premature birth to toilets that destroy deadly pathogens. I’m equally excited by how other technologies on the list will improve our lives. Wearable health monitors like the wrist-based ECG will warn heart patients of impending problems, while others let diabetics not only track glucose levels but manage their disease. Advanced nuclear reactors could provide carbon-free, safe, secure energy to the world.

One of my choices even offers us a peek at a future where society’s primary goal is personal fulfillment. Among many other applications, AI-driven personal agents might one day make your e-mail in-box more manageable—something that sounds trivial until you consider what possibilities open up when you have more free time.

The 30 minutes you used to spend reading e-mail could be spent doing other things. I know some people would use that time to get more work done—but I hope most would use it for pursuits like connecting with a friend over coffee, helping your child with homework, or even volunteering in your community.

That, I think, is a future worth working toward.

MIT Nuclear 2 c-mod-internal-1

 

You can read Part II Here

Advertisements

Saving Us From AI’s Worst Case Scenarios – An Interview with MIT Professor Max Tegmark


artificial-intelligence-people-mit-00_2

(AI) “… Instead, the largest threat would be if it turns extremely competent. This is because the competent goals may not be aligned with our goals either because it is controlled by someone who does not share our goals, or because the machine itself has power over us.”

Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the hottest trends pursued by the private sector, academics, and government institutions. The promise of AI is to make our lives better: to have an electronic brain to complement our own, to take over menial tasks so that we can focus on higher value activities, to allow us to make better decisions in our personal and professional lives.

There is also a darker side to AI that many fear. What happens when bad actors leverage AI for bad uses? How will we ensure that AI is not a wedge to divide the haves and have-nots further apart? Moreover, what happens when our jobs are fundamentally changed or go away when we derive so much of what defines us from what we do professionally?

Max Tegmark has studied these issues intimately from his perch as a professor at MIT and as the  co-founder of the Future of Life Institute. He has synthesized his own thoughts into a powerful book called Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. As the title suggests, AI will redefine what it means to be human due to the scale of the changes it will bring about.

                                                                     

Tegmark likes the analogy of the automobile to make the case for what is necessary for AI to be beneficial for humanity. He notes that the three things that are necessary are that it have an engine (the power to create value), it needs steering (so that it can be moved toward good rather than evil ends), and it must have direction or a roadmap for how to get to the beneficial destination. He notes that “the way    to create a good future with technology is to continuously win the wisdom race. As technology grows more powerful, the wisdom in which we manage it must keep up.” He describes all of this and more in this interview.  professor mark tegmark https___blogs-images.forbes.com_peterhigh_files_2019_01_maxresdefault-300x169

MIT Professor and Author, Max Tegmark CREDIT: MIT 

(To listen to an unabridged podcast version of this interview, please click this link. This is the 31st interview in the Tech Influencers series. To listen to past interviews with the likes of former Mexican President Vicente Fox, Sal Khan, Sebastian Thrun, Steve Case, Craig Newmark, Stewart Butterfield, and Meg Whitman, please visit this link. To read future articles in this series, please follow me on on Twitter @PeterAHigh.)

The Interview by Peter High

Peter High is President of Metis Strategy, a business and IT advisory firm. His latest book is Implementing World Class IT Strategy. He is also the author of World Class IT: Why Businesses Succeed When IT Triumphs.

 

Peter High: Congratulations on your book, Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. When and where did your interest in the topic of Artificial Intelligence [AI] begin?

High: When you have described your efforts to figure out where AI might take us, you make an analogy to driving a car. First, you need the engine and the power to make AI work. Second, you need steering because AI must be steered in one direction or another. Lastly, there needs to be a destination. Can you elaborate on each of those topics, and could you give us your hypothesis as to where we are heading?

Tegmark: If you are building a rocket or a car, it would be nuts to exclusively focus on the engine’s power while ignoring how to steer it. Even if you have the steering sorted out, you are going to have trouble if you are unable to determine where you are trying to go with it. Unfortunately, I believe this is what we are doing as we continue to build more powerful technology, especially with AI. To be as ambitious as possible, we need to think about all three elements, which are the power, the steering, and the destination of the technology.

Because it is so important, I spend a great deal of time at MIT focused on steering. Along with Jaan Tallinn and several other colleagues, I co-founded the Future of Life Institute, which [focuses on] the destination. While we are making AI more powerful, it is critical to know what type of society we are aspiring to create with this technology. If society accomplishes the original goal of AI research, which is to make so-called “Artificial General Intelligence” [AGI] that can do all jobs better than humans, we have to determine what it will mean to be a human in the future. I am convinced that if we succeed, it will either be the best or the worst advancement ever, and it will come down to the amount of planning we do now. If we have no clue about where we want to go, it is unlikely that we are going to end up in an ideal situation. However, if we plan accordingly and steer technology in the right direction, we can create an inspiring future that will allow humanity to flourish in a way that we have never seen before.

I believe this to be true because the reason that today’s society is better than the Stone Age is because of technology. Everything I love about civilization is the product of intelligence. Technology is the reason why the life expectancy is no longer 32 years. If we can take this further and amplify our intelligence with AI, we have the potential to solve humanity’s greatest challenges. These technologies can help us cure other diseases that we are currently told are incurable because we have not been smart enough to solve them. Further, technology can lift everybody out of poverty, solve the issues in our climate, and allow us to go in inspiring directions that we have not even thought of yet. It is clear that there is an enormous upside if we get this right, and that is why I am incredibly motivated to work on that.

High: I am struck by the caveman analogy. We are so far removed from cavemen and cavewomen that a modern human and caveman would not be able to recognize each other in terms of life expectancy, the ability to communicate, and the time we have to reflect and ponder our situation, among other differences.

Tegmark: That is so true, and you said something super interesting there. While we are so far removed, we are largely stuck in the caveman mindset. When we were cavemen, the most powerful technology we had were rocks and sticks, which limited our ancestors’ ability to cause significant damage. While there were always cavemen that wanted to harm as many people as possible, there was only so much damage one could do with a rock and a stick.

Unfortunately, with nuclear weapons, the damage can be devastating, and as technology gets more powerful, it becomes easier to mess up. However, at the same time, we now have more power to use technology for good. Because of both of these factors, the more powerful the technology gets, the more important the steering becomes. Technology is neither good nor evil, so when people ask me if I am for AI or against AI, I ask them if they are for fire or against fire. Fire can obviously be used to keep your house warm in the winter, or it can be used for arson. To keep this under control, we have put a great deal of effort into the steering of fire. We have fire extinguishers and fire departments, and we created ways to punish people who use fire in ways that are not appropriate.

We have to step out of our caveman mindset. The way to create a good future with technology is to continuously win the wisdom race. As technology grows more powerful, the wisdom in which we manage it must keep up. This was true with fire and with the automobile engine, and I believe we were successful in those missions. While we continuously messed up, we learned from our mistakes and invented the seat belt, the airbag, traffic lights, and laws against speeding. Ever since we were cavemen, we have been able to stay ahead in the wisdom race by learning from our mistakes. However, as technology gets more powerful, the margin for error is evaporating, and one mistake in the future may be one too many. We obviously do not want to have an “accidental” nuclear war with Russia and just brush it off as a mistake that we can learn from and be more careful of the next time. It is far more effective to be proactive and plan ahead, rather than reactive. I believe we need to implement this mindset before we build technology that can do everything better than us.

High: You mentioned there are some attributes that we still share with our distant ancestors. Even if AGI does not come for decades, the change will be almost the same in magnitude as the change from cavemen to the present day. For example, it potentially has the power to change the way in which we work. You have written persuasively about the possibility of what we do being taken over by AI. In a society where many of us are defined by the work that we do, it is quite unsettling to know that, what I love about my day job today will be done better by AI. We may need to redefine ourselves as a result. What are your perspectives on that?

Tegmark: I agree with that, and I would take it a step further and say that the jump from today to AGI is a bigger one than the jump from cavemen to the present day. When we were cavemen, we were the smartest species on the planet, and we still are today. With AGI, we will not be, which is a huge game changer. While we have doubled our life expectancy and seen new technologies emerge, we are still stuck on this tiny planet, and the majority of people still die within a century. However, if we can build AGI, the opportunities will be limitless.

People are not realizing this, and because we are still stuck in this caveman mindset, we continue to think that it will take us thousands of years to find a way to live 200, or even 1,000 years. Moreover, the mindset that we have to invent all the technologies ourselves has led us to believe that it will take thousands of years to move to another solar system. However, this is far from true because, by definition, AGI has the ability to do all jobs better than us, including jobs that can invent better AI among other technologies. This capability has led many to believe that AGI could be the last invention that we need to make. We may end up with a future where life on Earth and beyond flourishes for billions of years, not just for the next election cycle. This could all start on Earth if we can solve intelligence and use it to go in amazing directions. If we get this right, the upside will be far more significant than the benefits we reaped going from cavemen to the present day.

Regarding what it means to be a human if all jobs can be done better by machines, that is why the subtitle of my book is, Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. Jobs do not just give us an income, they give us meaning and a sense of purpose in our lives. Even if we can produce all that we need with machines and figure out how to share the wealth, it does not solve the question of how that purpose and meaning will be replaced. This crucial dilemma absolutely cannot be left to tech nerds such as myself because AI programmers are not world experts on what makes humans happy. We need to broaden this conversation to get everyone on board and discuss what type of future we want to create. This is essential, and unfortunately, I do not believe that we are going about this the right way.

Students often walk into my office asking for career advice, and in response, I always start by asking them about where they want to be in the future. If all the student can say is that they may get cancer, be murdered, or run over by a truck, that is a terrible strategy for career planning. I want these people to come in with fire in their eyes and say, “This is where I want to be.” From there, we can figure out what the challenges are and come up with a strong strategy to avoid them so that they can get to where they want to be. While we should take this same approach as a species, it is not the one we are taking. Every time I go to the movies and see something about the future, it showcases one dystopia after another. This approach makes us paranoid, and it divides us in the same way that fear always has. It is crucial for us to have a conversation around the type of futures we are excited about. I am not talking about getting 10 percent richer or curing a minor disease, but I want people to think big. If machines can do everything with technology, what kind of future would fire us up? What type of society do we want to live in? What would your typical day look like? If we can articulate a shared, positive vision that catches on around the world, I believe we have a real chance of getting there.

High: What happens if AGI gets to the point where the work that you are doing at MIT and at the Future of Life Institute is no longer meaningful?

Tegmark: That is a hard-hitting question. I get an incredible amount of joy from figuring stuff out, and if I could just press a button and the computer would write my papers for me, would it be as much fun? This is not an easy topic.

In my book, I discuss twelve different futures that people can choose between. Just because we can think about a future that we are convinced is perfect, does not mean that we should do nothing. At a minimum, we should do the necessary thinking that will allow us to steer our future in the right direction. There are some obvious decisions that need to be made now, such as how income inequality will be handled. While we may be able to dramatically grow the overall world GDP, we must be able to share this economic pie so that everybody is better off. As more and more jobs get replaced by machines, incomes that have typically been paid in salaries will go towards whoever owns the machines. This concept is why Facebook, a high-tech company, is twelve times more valuable than Ford, despite the fact that it has eight times fewer employees. Unfortunately, we have not begun to make these decisions, and if we are unable to do so to the point where everyone benefits, then shame on us. As companies become more high-tech, we must make twists to the system to avoid leaving more people behind and ending up with far more income inequality. If this problem does not get solved, we will end up with more and more angry people, which will make democracy more and more unworkable. However, on the bright side, all that wealth makes this problem relatively easy to fix. All that needs to be done is to bring in enough tax revenue so that everyone can be better off.

The second aspect, which I believe is a no-brainer, is that we must ensure that we avoid a damaging arms race with the lethal autonomous weapons. Fortunately, nearly all the research in AI is going towards helping people in various ways, and most AI researchers want to keep it that way. Around the time I was born, we were on the cusp of a horrible arms race with bioweapons. When this happened, the biologists pushed hard to get an international ban on bioweapons, and as a result, most people cannot remember the last time they read about a bioweapon terrorist attack in the newspaper. If you ask a hundred random people on the street about their opinions on biology, they are all going to smile and associate it with new cures, rather than with bioweapons. It is critical that we handle AI weapons in a similar way.

We need to put a greater focus on the steering aspect of AI. Nearly all of the funding going into AI has been around making it more powerful, and little is going towards AI safety research. Even increasing this a little bit will make an impactful difference. As we put AI in charge of more infrastructure-level decisions, we must transform buggy and hackable computers into robust AI systems that can be trusted. If we fail to do so, all these fascinating new technologies can malfunction, harm us, or be hacked and used against us.ai-davenport-artificial-intelligence-pilots-innovators-early-adopters-implementation-industry-production-1200

As AI becomes more and more capable, we have to work on the value alignment problems of AI. The real threat with AGI is not that it is going to turn evil in the way that it does in the silly Hollywood movies. Instead, the largest threat would be if it turns extremely competent. This is because the competent goals may not be aligned with our goals either because it is controlled by someone who does not share our goals, or because the machine itself has power over us. We must solve some tough technical challenges in order to neutralize this threat. We have to figure out how to make machines understand our goals, adopt our goals, and then keep these goals if they get smarter. Although work has begun in this area, these problems are hard, and it may take roughly 30 years to solve them. It is absolutely critical that we focus on this problem now so that we have the answers by the time we need them. We have to stop looking at these issues as an afterthought.

High: What role do private sector, academic, and governmental institutions play? Each is exerting influence in their own ways, and they are progressing at different rates. How do you see that balance?

mit tegmark bkawytw4szvjjak4s5xa8e-320-80Tegmark: Academia is great for developing solutions to AI safety problems while making them publicly available so that everyone in the world can use them. You want safety solutions to be free because if someone owns the IP on them, it will cause a worse outcome.

I believe private companies have mostly played a constructive role in helping encourage the safety work around AI. For example, most of the big players in AI, such as Google, IBM, Microsoft, Facebook, and many international companies, have joined together in an AI partnership to encourage safety development.

On the flip side, governments need to step it up and provide more funding for the safety research. No government should fund nuclear reactor research without funding reactor safety research. Similarly, no country should fund computer science research without putting a decent slice towards the steering part.

That is my wish list as to what we should focus on in the current day to maximize the chances of this going well. In parallel, everyone else needs to ask themselves what future they want to see. They should remember that the next time they vote and whenever they exert influence, we want to create a future for everybody.

High: How do you keep up with the progress or lack thereof of these advances?

Tegmark: Both through the research taking place at MIT and through the nerdy AI conferences that I go to. Additionally, the non-profit work that I have been doing has been fascinating. I have spent a great deal of time speaking with top researchers and CEOs who are making incredible progress on this. I am encouraged, and I find that the leaders are mostly an idealistic bunch. I do not believe that they are doing this exclusively for the money. Instead, they want this technology to represent an opportunity to create a better future. We need to make sure that the society at large shares this goal of channeling AI for good, instead of using it to hack elections and create new ways to murder people anonymously. That would be an incredibly sad result of all these good intentions.

Peter High is President of Metis Strategy, a business and IT advisory firm. His latest book is Implementing World Class IT Strategy. He is also the author of World Class IT: Why Businesses Succeed When IT Triumphs. Peter moderates the Forum on World Class IT podcast series. He speaks at conferences around the world. Follow him on Twitter @PeterAHigh.

 

I am the president of Metis Strategy, a business and IT strategy firm that I founded in 2001. I have advised many of the best chief information officers at multi-billion dollar corporations in the United States and abroad. I’ve written for the Wall Street Journal, CIO Magazi… MORE

Four Emerging Technology Areas That Will Help Define Our World In 2019


Welcome to 2019....

2018 was surely a transformative year for technological innovation. We saw early development of ambient computing, quantum teleportation, cloaks of invisibility, genomics advancements and even robocops.

Granted we’re not flying around in our own cars like the Jetsons did yet, but we’re closer. In 2019 we will continue on the transformation path and expand even more into adopting cutting edge immersive technologies.

What’s ahead for the coming year? I envision four emerging technology areas that will significantly impact our lives in 2019.

1.  The Internet of Things and Smart Cities

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the general idea of devices and equipment that are readable, recognizable, locatable, addressable, and/or controllable via the internet. 

This includes everything from home appliances, wearable technology and cars. These days, if a device can be turned on, it most likely can be connected to the internet. Because of this, data can be shared quickly across a multitude of objects and devices increasing the rate of communications.

Cisco, who terms the “Internet of Things,” “The Internet of Everything,” predicts that 50 billion devices (including our smartphones, appliances and office equipment) will be wirelessly connected via a network of sensors to the internet by 2020.

The term “Smart City” connotes creating a public/private infrastructure to conduct activities that protect and secure citizens. The concept of Smart Cities integrates communications (5-G), transportation, energy, water resources, waste collections, smart-building technologies, and security technologies and services. They are the cities of the future.

IoT is the cog of Smart Cities that integrates these resources, technologies, services and infrastructure.

The research firm Frost & Sullivan estimates the combined global market potential of Smart City segments (transportation, healthcare, building, infrastructure, energy and governance) to be $1.5 Trillion ($20B by 2050 on sensors alone according to Navigant Technology).

The combined growth of IoT and Smart Cities will be a force to reckon with in 2019!

     2.  Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Emergent artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, human-computer interface, and augmented reality technologies are no longer science fiction. Head-spinning technological advances allow us to gain greater data-driven insights than ever before.

The ethical debate about AI is fervent over the threatening implications of future technologies that can think like a human (or better) and make their own decisions. The creation of a “Hal” type entity as depicted in Stanley Kubrick’s film, 2001 A Space Odyssey, is not far-fetched.

To truly leverage our ability to use data driven insights we need to make sure our thinking about how to best use this data keeps pace with its availability.

The vast majority of digital data is unstructured: a complex mesh of images, texts, videos and other data formats. Estimates suggest 80-90 percent of the world’s data is unstructured and growing at an increasingly rapid rate each day.

To even begin to make sense of this much data, advanced technologies are required. Artificial intelligence is the means by which this data is processed today, and it’s already a part of your everyday life.

In 2019, companies and governments will continue to develop technology that distributes artificial intelligence and machine learning software to millions of graphics and computer processors around the world. The question is how far away are we from a “Hal” with the ability for human analysis and techno emotions? 

     3.  Quantum Computing

The world of computing has witnessed seismic advancements since the invention of the electronic calculator in the 1960s. The past few years in information processing have been especially transformational.

What were once thought of as science fiction fantasies are now technological realities. Classical computing has become more exponentially faster and more capable and our enabling devices smaller and more adaptable.

We are starting to evolve beyond classical computing into a new data era called quantum computing. It is envisioned that quantum computing will accelerate us into the future by impacting the landscape of artificial intelligence and data analytics.

The quantum computing power and speed will help us solve some of the biggest and most complex challenges we face as humans.

Gartner describes quantum computing as: “[T]he use of atomic quantum states to effect computation. Data is held in qubits (quantum bits), which have the ability to hold all possible states simultaneously. Data held in qubits is affected by data held in other qubits, even when physically separated.

This effect is known as entanglement.” In a simplified description, quantum computers use quantum bits or qubits instead of using binary traditional bits of ones and zeros for digital communications.

Futurist Ray Kurzweil said that mankind will be able to “expand the scope of our intelligence a billion-fold” and that “the power of computing doubles, on average, every two years.” Recent breakthroughs in physics, nanotechnology and materials science have brought us into a computing reality that we could not have imagined a decade ago.

As we get closer to a fully operational quantum computer, a new world of supercomputing beckons that will impact on almost every aspect of our lives. In 2019 we are inching closer.

     4.  Cybersecurity (and Risk Management)

Many corporations, organizations and agencies have continued to be breached throughout 2018 despite cybersecurity investments on information assurance. The cyber threats grow more sophisticated and deadly with each passing year. The firm Gemalto estimated that data breaches compromised 4.5 billion records in first half of 2018. And a University of Maryland study found that hackers now attack computers every 39 seconds.

In 2019 we will be facing a new and more sophisticated array of physical security and cybersecurity challenges (including automated hacker tools) that pose significant risk to people, places and commercial networks.

The nefarious global threat actors are terrorists, criminals, hackers, organized crime, malicious individuals, and in some cases, adversarial nation states.

The physical has merged with the digital in the cybersecurity ecosystem. The more digitally interconnected we become in our work and personal lives, the more vulnerable we will become. Now everyone and anything connected is a target.

Cybersecurity is the digital glue that keeps IoT, Smart Cities, and our world of converged machines, sensors, applications and algorithms operational.

Addressing the 2019 cyber-threat also requires incorporating a better and more calculated risk awareness and management security strategy by both the public and private sectors. A 2019 cybersecurity risk management strategy will need to be comprehensive, adaptive and elevated to the C-Suite. 

I have just touched on a few of the implications of four emerging technology areas that will have significant impact in our lives in 2019.

These areas are just the tip of the iceberg as we really are in the midst of a paradigm shift in applied scientific knowledge.  We have entered a new renaissance of accelerated technological development that is exponentially transforming our civilization.

Yet with these benefits come risks. With such catalyzing innovation, we cannot afford to lose control. The real imperative for this new year is for planning and systematic integration.  

Hopefully that will provide us with a guiding technological framework that will keep us prosperous and safe.

Article by Chuck Brooks Special to Forbes Magazine
Chuck Brooks is an Advisor and Contributor to Cognitive World. In his full time role he is the Principal Market Growth Strategist for General Dynamics Mission Systems…MORE

AI and Nanotechnology Team Up to bring Humans to the brink of IMMORTALITY, top scientist claims


IMMORTAL: Human beings could soon live forever 

HUMAN beings becoming immortal is a step closer following the launch of a new start-up.

Dr Ian Pearson has previously said people will have the ability to “not die” by 2050 – just over 30 years from now.

Two of the methods he said humans might use were “body part renewal” and linking bodies with machines so that people are living their lives through an android.

But after Dr Pearson’s predictions, immortality may now be a step nearer following the launch of a new start-up.

Human is hoping to make the immortality dream a reality with an ambitious plan.

Josh Bocanegra, the CEO of the company, said he is hoping to use Artificial Intelligence technology to create its own human being in the next three decades.

He said: “We’re using artificial intelligence and nanotechnology to store data of conversational styles, behavioural patterns, thought processes and information about how your body functions from the inside-out.

Watch

Live to 2050 and “Live Forever” Really?

“This data will be coded into multiple sensor technologies, which will be built into an artificial body with the brain of a deceased human.

“Using cloning technology, we will restore the brain as it matures.” 

Last year, UK-based stem cell bank StemProject said it could eventually potentially develop treatments that allow humans to live until 200.

Mark Hall, from StemProtect, said at the time: “In just the same way as we might replace a joint such as a hip with a specially made synthetic device, we can now replace cells in the body with new cells which are healthy and younger versions of the ones they’re replacing.

“That means we can replace diseased or ageing cells – and parts of the body – with entirely new ones which are completely natural and healthy.”

Watch Dr. Ian Pearson Talk About the Possibility of Immortality by 2050

7 Emerging Technologies that are Changing Mission Critical Processes: IoT .. AI .. AR and


An article by Jorge Sagastume, Vice President at EscrowTech International, Inc.

Sometimes, even the simplest of processes can be critical to the continued day-to-day operation of your business. That’s why businesses should be taking a proactive approach to enhancing their processes by making use of the latest technologies available that could facilitate business process management.

Here are 7 technologies — including Blockchain technology and the Internet of Things — that are already demonstrating how they have the potential to completely overhaul existing critical processes:

 

1. Blockchain

Your data is important. In fact, it’s crucial to your vital business processes. Your data can tell you what you need to do, how you need to do it, and when it needs to be done. So what happens if that data is inaccurate, or is tampered with through either internal or external sources? Process failure. That’s where Blockchain technology comes in. The ‘Blockchain’ is a database or ledger that records transactions, activity, or behaviors automatically without the need for human input. It cannot be altered, changed, or amended manually, significantly boosting the accuracy, security, and efficiency of your critical processes. Most commonly associated with cryptocurrency, Blockchain can be used in practically any industry.

2. Internet of Things

Mission critical processes are essential for the continued smooth running of a business, but an ongoing concern with these vital processes is that they can be challenging to analyze and review to ensure they’re the most efficient, effective, and productive processes that the business could be using. That’s why many businesses are looking into the Internet of Things, or IoT. IoT is the concept of interconnected devices; one talks to another, to another, and so on as necessary. These devices can also be set up to operate on an ‘if x, then x’ schedule. In terms of mission-critical processes, connected devices can be used to gather data from multiple areas to comprehensively monitor and record how you work.

3. Business Process Automation Software

Business Process Automation software, or BPA software, works to simplify your mission-critical processes, minimize the need for human input (thereby reducing the risk of human error), and streamline the way you work. However, it is important to understand that forming a heavy reliance on automation software isn’t an entirely risk-free endeavor, particularly if you use the cloud-based software. While there are advantages of the cloud, there are also concerns. If your business relies on third-party software for mission-critical processes, consider a software escrow agreement, where the source code for the BPA software is held by a neutral agency and released to you should your provider go bankrupt.

4. Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence, or AI, is a key catalyst facilitating the new ‘digital transformation’; a shift from rigid business processes to more flexible approaches using the intelligent software. AI and machine-learning technologies become smarter with continued use, as they ‘learn’ more about operations. This can able your technology to identify process flow patterns, apply fixes to enhance the process, locate patterns and trends in your way of working and highlight any room for improvement. The technology can predict how your business processes will fare in the future by merging with existing business process management platforms ultimately improving continuity, lowering costs, and boosting efficiency.

5. Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has been around for a while, but it is only recently that it has become ready to support mission-critical processes and applications. Part of this readiness stems from the longevity and continued strength of cloud providers, and the ability of providers to demonstrate experience in IT management. By moving mission-critical processes to the cloud, businesses find that they have greater flexibility, enabling them to focus more on their own core competencies which, in many cases, is not IT-based. Cloud providers today are able to show solid track records in terms of security and reliability, perhaps more so than businesses themselves are able to demonstrate, meaning mission-critical applications are safe.

6. Edge Computing

Although cloud computing and edge computing are often said to be polar opposites, both technologies have the potential to completely overhaul existing mission-critical processes. While cloud computing is concerned with a central ‘hub’, edge computing is more focused on the availability of several shared-effort facilities, often located closer to the user (or on the ‘edge’). In terms of mission-critical processes, the advantage for businesses is notable low latency which can boost the speed of your processes and facilitate real-time functionality to improve accuracy and efficiency. However, not all providers are able to offer edge computing yet, and it is still considered to be an emerging technology.

7. Augmented Reality

Augmented reality already has a firm place in commerce; it’s used to try on clothes without buying, check that furniture fits in the home, or see a new car on the driveway without signing the contract. However, augmented reality, or AR, is still relatively new in terms of internal mission-critical processes, but it certainly seems to have a place. Google Glass was one of the first examples of how AR could be used in the enterprise, and how it could impact business processes. It can enable users to overlay their environment with vital information to ensure accurate troubleshooting, faster fix times, optimal productivity, better learning, and enhanced safety, all using a completely hands-free method.

About the author:
Jorge Sagastume is a Vice President at EscrowTech International, Inc. with 12 years of experience protecting IP and earning the trust of the greatest companies in the world. Jorge has been invited to speak on IP issues by foreign governments and international agencies.

MIT launches the “MIT Intelligence Quest … MIT IQ” (Video)


MIT AI IQ 87e48072-b50e-4701-b38e-f236c0c22280-original

At a time of rapid advances in intelligence research across many disciplines, the Intelligence Quest — MIT IQ — will encourage researchers to investigate the societal implications of their work as they pursue hard problems lying beyond the current horizon of what is known. Courtesy of MIT IQ

New Institute-wide initiative will advance human and machine intelligence research

MIT today announced the launch of the MIT Intelligence Quest, an initiative to discover the foundations of human intelligence and drive the development of technological tools that can positively influence virtually every aspect of society.

The announcement was first made in a letter MIT President L. Rafael Reif sent to the Institute community.

At a time of rapid advances in intelligence research across many disciplines, the Intelligence Quest — MIT IQ — will encourage researchers to investigate the societal implications of their work as they pursue hard problems lying beyond the current horizon of what is known. (continued below)

Watch and Read About: Scott Zoldi, Director of Analytics at FICO, has published a report that “we are just at the beginning of the golden age of analytics, in which the value and contributions of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (AA) and of deep learning can only continue to expand as we accept and incorporate those tools into our businesses. ” And according to the expert’s predictions, in 2018, the development and use of these technologies will continue to expand and strengthen. And consider that next year:

 

(Continued)

Some of these advances may be foundational in nature, involving new insight into human intelligence, and new methods to allow machines to learn effectively. Others may be practical tools for use in a wide array of research endeavors, such as disease diagnosis, drug discovery, materials and manufacturing design, automated systems, synthetic biology, and finance.

“Today we set out to answer two big questions, says President Reif. “How does human intelligence work, in engineering terms? And how can we use that deep grasp of human intelligence to build wiser and more useful machines, to the benefit of society?”

MIT IQ: The Core and The Bridge

MIT is poised to lead this work through two linked entities within MIT IQ. One of them, “The Core,” will advance the science and engineering of both human and machine intelligence. A key output of this work will be machine-learning algorithms. At the same time, MIT IQ seeks to advance our understanding of human intelligence by using insights from computer science. brain-quantum-2-b2b_wsf

The second entity, “The Bridge” will be dedicated to the application of MIT discoveries in natural and artificial intelligence to all disciplines, and it will host state-of-the-art tools from industry and research labs worldwide.

The Bridge will provide a variety of assets to the MIT community, including intelligence technologies, platforms, and infrastructure; education for students, faculty, and staff about AI tools; rich and unique data sets; technical support; and specialized hardware.

Along with developing and advancing the technologies of intelligence, MIT IQ researchers will also investigate the societal and ethical implications of advanced analytical and predictive tools. There are already active projects and groups at the Institute investigating autonomous systems, media and information quality, labor markets and the work of the future, innovation and the digital economy, and the role of AI in the legal system.

In all its activities, MIT IQ is intended to take advantage of — and strengthen — the Institute’s culture of collaboration. MIT IQ will connect and amplify existing excellence across labs and centers already engaged in intelligence research. It will also establish shared, central spaces conducive to group work, and its resources will directly support research.

“Our quest is meant to power world-changing possibilities,” says Anantha Chandrakasan, dean of the MIT School of Engineering and Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Chandrakasan, in collaboration with Provost Martin Schmidt and all four of MIT’s other school deans, has led the development and establishment of MIT IQ.

“We imagine preventing deaths from cancer by using deep learning for early detection and personalized treatment,” Chandrakasan continues. “We imagine artificial intelligence in sync with, complementing, and assisting our own intelligence. And we imagine every scientist and engineer having access to human-intelligence-inspired algorithms that open new avenues of discovery in their fields. Researchers across our campus want to push the boundaries of what’s possible.”

Engaging energetically with partners

In order to power MIT IQ and achieve results that are consistent with its ambitions, the Institute will raise financial support through corporate sponsorship and philanthropic giving.

MIT IQ will build on the model that was established with the MIT–IBM Watson AI Lab, which was announced in September 2017. MIT researchers will collaborate with each other and with industry on challenges that range in scale from the very broad to the very specific.

“In the short time since we began our collaboration with IBM, the lab has garnered tremendous interest inside and outside MIT, and it will be a vital part of MIT IQ,” says President Reif.

John E. Kelly III, IBM senior vice president for cognitive solutions and research, says, “To take on the world’s greatest challenges and seize its biggest opportunities, we need to rapidly advance both AI technology and our understanding of human intelligence. Building on decades of collaboration — including our extensive joint MIT–IBM Watson AI Lab — IBM and MIT will together shape a new agenda for intelligence research and its applications. We are proud to be a cornerstone of this expanded initiative.”

MIT will seek to establish additional entities within MIT IQ, in partnership with corporate and philanthropic organizations.

Why MIT

MIT has been on the frontier of intelligence research since the 1950s, when pioneers Marvin Minsky and John McCarthy helped establish the field of artificial intelligence.

MIT now has over 200 principal investigators whose research bears directly on intelligence. Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the MIT Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) — along with the McGovern Institute for Brain Research and the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory — collaborate on a range of projects. MIT is also home to the National Science Foundation–funded center for Brains, Minds and Machines (CBMM) — the only national center of its kind.

Four years ago, MIT launched the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society (IDSS) with a mission promoting data science, particularly in the context of social systems. It is  anticipated that faculty and students from IDSS will play a critical role in this initiative.

Faculty from across the Institute will participate in the initiative, including researchers in the Media Lab, the Operations Research Center, the Sloan School of Management, the School of Architecture and Planning, and the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

“Our quest will amount to a journey taken together by all five schools at MIT,” says Provost Schmidt. “Success will rest on a shared sense of purpose and a mix of contributions from a wide variety of disciplines. I’m excited by the new thinking we can help unlock.”

At the heart of MIT IQ will be collaboration among researchers in human and artificial intelligence.

“To revolutionize the field of artificial intelligence, we should continue to look to the roots of intelligence: the brain,” says James DiCarlo, department head and Peter de Florez Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. “By working with engineers and artificial intelligence researchers, human intelligence researchers can build models of the brain systems that produce intelligent behavior. The time is now, as model building at the scale of those brain systems is now possible. Discovering how the brain works in the language of engineers will not only lead to transformative AI — it will also illuminate entirely new ways to repair, educate, and augment our own minds.”

Daniela Rus, the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and director of CSAIL, agrees. MIT researchers, she says, “have contributed pioneering and visionary solutions for intelligence since the beginning of the field, and are excited to make big leaps to understand human intelligence and to engineer significantly more capable intelligent machines. Understanding intelligence will give us the knowledge to understand ourselves and to create machines that will support us with cognitive and physical work.”

David Siegel, who earned a PhD in computer science at MIT in 1991 pursuing research at MIT’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and who is a member of the MIT Corporation and an advisor to the MIT Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, has been integral to the vision and formation of MIT IQ and will continue to help shape the effort. “Understanding human intelligence is one of the greatest scientific challenges,” he says, “one that helps us understand who we are while meaningfully advancing the field of artificial intelligence.” Siegel is co-chairman and a founder of Two Sigma Investments, LP.

The fruits of research

MIT IQ will thus provide a platform for long-term research, encouraging the foundational advances of the future. At the same time, MIT professors and researchers may develop technologies with near-term value, leading to new kinds of collaborations with existing companies — and to new companies.

Some such entrepreneurial efforts could be supported by The Engine, an Institute initiative launched in October 2016 to support startup companies pursuing particularly ambitious goals.

Other innovations stemming from MIT IQ could be absorbed into the innovation ecosystem surrounding the Institute — in Kendall Square, Cambridge, and the Boston metropolitan area. MIT is located in close proximity to a world-leading nexus of biotechnology and medical-device research and development, as well as a cluster of leading-edge technology firms that study and deploy machine intelligence.

MIT also has roots in centers of innovation elsewhere in the United States and around the world, through faculty research projects, institutional and industry collaborations, and the activities and leadership of its alumni. MIT IQ will seek to connect to innovative companies and individuals who share MIT’s passion for work in intelligence.

Eric Schmidt, former executive chairman of Alphabet, has helped MIT form the vision for MIT IQ. “Imagine the good that can be done by putting novel machine-learning tools in the hands of those who can make great use of them,” he says. “MIT IQ can become a fount of exciting new capabilities.”

“I am thrilled by today’s news,” says President Reif. “Drawing on MIT’s deep strengths and signature values, culture, and history, MIT IQ promises to make important contributions to understanding the nature of intelligence, and to harnessing it to make a better world.”

“MIT is placing a bet,” he says, “on the central importance of intelligence research to meeting the needs of humanity.”

A novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots: 100K Faster computer controls for molecular machines


fastcomputerElectric fields drive the rotating nano-crane – 100,000 times faster than previous methods. Credit: Enzo Kopperger / TUM

Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories. The new research results will appear as the cover story on 19th January in the renowned scientific journal Science.

Up and down, up and down. The points of light alternate back and forth in lockstep. They are produced by glowing molecules affixed to the ends of tiny robot arms. Prof. Friedrich Simmel observes the movement of the nanomachines on the monitor of a fluorescence microscope. A simple mouse click is all it takes for the points of light to move in another direction.

“By applying electric fields, we can arbitrarily rotate the arms in a plane,” explains the head of the Chair of Physics of Synthetic Biological Systems at TU Munich. His team has for the first time managed to control nanobots electrically and has at the same time set a record: The new technique is 100 000 times faster than all previous methods.

DNA-origami robots for the manufacturing plants of tomorrow

Scientists around the world are working on new technologies for the nanofactories of the future. They hope these will one day be used to analyse biochemical samples or produce active medical agents. The required miniature machines can already be produced cost-effectively using the DNA-origami technique.

The only reason these  have not been deployed on a large scale to date is that they are too slow. The building blocks are activated with enzymes, strands of DNA or light to then perform specific tasks, for example to gather and transport molecules.

Fast computer control for molecular machines
Rotation of the arm between two docking points (red and blue). Credit: Enzo Kopperger / TUM

However, traditional nanobots take minutes to carry out these actions, sometimes even hours. Therefore, efficient molecular assembly lines cannot, for all practical intents and purposes, be implemented using these methodologies.

Electronic speed boost

“Building up a nanotechnological assembly line calls for a different kind of propulsion technology. We came up with the idea of dropping biochemical nanomachine switching completely in favour of the interactions between DNA structures and electric fields,” explains TUM researcher Simmel, who is also the co-coordinator of the Excellence Cluster Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM).

The principle behind the propulsion technology is simple: DNA molecules have negative charges. The biomolecules can thus be moved by applying electric fields. Theoretically, this should allow nanobots made of DNA to be steered using electrical impulses.

Robotic movement under the microscope

To determine whether and how fast the robot arms would line up with an electric field, the researchers affixed several million nanobot arms to a glass substrate and placed this into a sample holder with electrical contacts designed specifically for the purpose.

Each of the miniature machines produced by the lead author Enzo Kopperger comprises a 400 nanometer arm attached to a rigid 55 by 55 nanometer base plate with a flexible joint made of unpaired bases. This construction ensures that the arms can rotate arbitrarily in the horizontal plane.

In collaboration with fluorescence specialists headed by Prof. Don C. Lamb of the Ludwig Maximillians University Munich, the researchers marked the tips of the  using pigment molecules. They observed their motion using a . They then changed the direction of the electric field. This allowed the researchers to arbitrarily alter the orientation of the arms and control the locomotion process.

“The experiment demonstrated that molecular machines can be moved, and thus also driven electrically,” says Simmel. “Thanks to the electronic control process, we can now initiate movements on a millisecond time scale and are thus 100 000 times faster than with previously used biochemical approaches.”

On the road to a nanofactory

The new control technology is suited not only for moving around pigments and nanoparticles. The arms of the miniature robots can also apply force to molecules. These interactions can be utilized for diagnostics and in pharmaceutical development, emphasizes Simmel. “Nanobots are small and economical. Millions of them could work in parallel to look for specific substances in samples or to synthesize complex molecules – not unlike an .”

 Explore further: Scientists create world’s first ‘molecular robot’ capable of building molecules

More information: Enzo Kopperger et al. A self-assembled nanoscale robotic arm controlled by electric fields, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aao4284

 

‘Neural Lace’ or BCI (brain computer interface) ~ Elon Musk & new start-up Neuralink hope to ‘inject’ the Possibilities: Video


brain-quantum-1-download (1)Elon Musk is funding research towards “neural lace,” a brain computer interface technology that could allow our brains to compete with AI.

“The Journal reported that the new startup will focus on “neural lace” technology which involves implanting tiny brain electrodes capable of uploading and downloading thoughts. The report said Musk has taken an active role setting up the company and may play a ‘significant leadership role’ even as he runs two other large companies. Musk has previously spoken about the idea of neural lacing, claiming it can magnify people’s brain power by linking them directly to computing capabilities.”

“Billionaire futurist space explorer Elon Musk has a new project: a ”medical research company’ called Neuralink that will make brain-computer interfaces. Musk’s projects are frequently inspired by science fiction, and this one is a direct reference to a device called a ‘neural lace,’ invented by the late British novelist Iain M. Banks for his Culture series. In those books, characters grow a semi-organic mesh on their cerebral cortexes, which allows them to interface wirelessly with AIs and create backups of their minds.”

“Smarter artificial intelligence is certainly being developed, but how far along are we on producing a neural lace? At the conference, Musk said he didn’t know of any company that was working on one. But last year, a team of researchers led by Charles Lieber, the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, described in Nature Nanotechnology a lace-like electronic mesh that ‘you could literally inject’ into three-dimensional synthetic and biological structures like the brain.”

Read The Harvard/ Nature Nanotechnology Article: Will This “Neural Lace” Brain Implant Help Us Compete with AI? Charles Leiber Harvard Neural Lace 10262_0247f3dd84906223785fddb18353bafe

Dr. Charles Lieber, Harvard University

Watch the YouTube Video:

 So what do YOU think? Science of Science Fiction? Please leave us your Comments. ~ Team GNT   GNT New Thumbnail LARGE 2016        

Science in 360°: Say ‘hello’ to HERMAN, The Nanoparticle Robot: Video


fourth-ir-aaeaaqaaaaaaaag8aaaajdziytbjm2jlltblzgmtnddmyy1hnjdkltk0nzuyzdfjmgm0mg
Published on Mar 7, 2017
Science in 360°: Say hello to HERMAN, a robot that accelerates the synthesis of nanoparticles for a wide range of cool applications such as biosensors, smart window coatings, and display technologies. HERMAN (aka High-throughput Experimentation Robot for the Multiplexed Automation of Nanochemistry) is a one-of-a-kind robot at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry that brings parallel processing and an extreme level of precision to the materials discovery process.